Stellar origin of the182Hf cosmochronometer and the presolar history of solar system matter

Maria Lugaro, Alexander Heger, Dean Osrin, Stephane Goriely, Kai Zuber, Amanda I. Karakas, Brad K. Gibson, Carolyn L. Doherty, John C. Lattanzio, U. Ott

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Abstract

Among the short-lived radioactive nuclei inferred to be present in the early solar system via meteoritic analyses, there are several heavier than iron whose stellar origin has been poorly understood. In particular, the abundances inferred for 182Hf (half-life = 8.9 million years) and 129I (half-life = 15.7 million years) are in disagreement with each other if both nuclei are produced by the rapid neutron-capture process. Here, we demonstrate that contrary to previous assumption, the slow neutron-capture process in asymptotic giant branch stars produces 182Hf. This has allowed us to date the last rapid and slow neutron-capture events that contaminated the solar system material at ∼100 million years and ∼30 million years, respectively, before the formation of the Sun.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)650-653
Number of pages4
JournalScience
Volume345
Issue number6197
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Aug 8 2014

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thermal neutrons
half life
solar system
histories
neutrons
nuclei
asymptotic giant branch stars
iron

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Lugaro, M., Heger, A., Osrin, D., Goriely, S., Zuber, K., Karakas, A. I., ... Ott, U. (2014). Stellar origin of the182Hf cosmochronometer and the presolar history of solar system matter. Science, 345(6197), 650-653. https://doi.org/10.1126/science.1253338

Stellar origin of the182Hf cosmochronometer and the presolar history of solar system matter. / Lugaro, Maria; Heger, Alexander; Osrin, Dean; Goriely, Stephane; Zuber, Kai; Karakas, Amanda I.; Gibson, Brad K.; Doherty, Carolyn L.; Lattanzio, John C.; Ott, U.

In: Science, Vol. 345, No. 6197, 08.08.2014, p. 650-653.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Lugaro, M, Heger, A, Osrin, D, Goriely, S, Zuber, K, Karakas, AI, Gibson, BK, Doherty, CL, Lattanzio, JC & Ott, U 2014, 'Stellar origin of the182Hf cosmochronometer and the presolar history of solar system matter', Science, vol. 345, no. 6197, pp. 650-653. https://doi.org/10.1126/science.1253338
Lugaro M, Heger A, Osrin D, Goriely S, Zuber K, Karakas AI et al. Stellar origin of the182Hf cosmochronometer and the presolar history of solar system matter. Science. 2014 Aug 8;345(6197):650-653. https://doi.org/10.1126/science.1253338
Lugaro, Maria ; Heger, Alexander ; Osrin, Dean ; Goriely, Stephane ; Zuber, Kai ; Karakas, Amanda I. ; Gibson, Brad K. ; Doherty, Carolyn L. ; Lattanzio, John C. ; Ott, U. / Stellar origin of the182Hf cosmochronometer and the presolar history of solar system matter. In: Science. 2014 ; Vol. 345, No. 6197. pp. 650-653.
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