State of health related to marital status in the Hungarian population

Balog Piroska, Eszter Mészáros, M. Kopp

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Objectives: The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of marital status on state of health. Methods: Data were obtained from the Hungarostudy 2002, a national representative study: 12668 persons were interviewed, representing the Hungarian adult population. Questions referring to marital status, age, education, and different diseases were included in the survey. Shortened Marital Stress Scale, Shortened Beck Depression Inventory, Hospital Anxiety Scale, Shortened Vital Exhaustion Questionnaire and Sleep Complaints Scale have been used. Results: 18% of the adult Hungarian population are single, 60.8% are married or living in a common low marriage, 8.7% are divorced, or living separately from their spouses and 12.4% are widowed. We have differentiated low stressed and high stressed marriages, and we have found that all diseases occurred more frequently in high stressed marriages, both among men and women. Among women these differences were significant in gynecological problems, endangered pregnancy, abortions, panic and depression. For men these differences were significant for diseases caused by alcohol and drug abuse. We have analyzed the relation of marital status to depression, anxiety, sleep complaints, and vital exhaustion. After controlling for age and education, the highest scores for depression, anxiety, sleep complaints, and vital exhaustion, were found in stressed marriages (higher than in divorcee or widowhood), both for men and women. These values were significantly higher, compared to the lowest values, which were found in good marriages, both for men and women. Conclusions: Marriage in itself is not a protective factor against diseases: stressed marriages are related to an increased incidence of different diseases. Good marriages were related to good health.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)137-138
Number of pages2
JournalPsychology and Health
Volume19
Issue numberSUPPL. 1
Publication statusPublished - Jun 2004

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Marital Status
Marriage
Health
Population
Depression
Widowhood
Sleep
Anxiety
Hospital Inventories
Education
Panic
Divorce
Spouses
Alcoholism
Substance-Related Disorders
Pregnancy
Incidence

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health
  • Psychology(all)

Cite this

State of health related to marital status in the Hungarian population. / Piroska, Balog; Mészáros, Eszter; Kopp, M.

In: Psychology and Health, Vol. 19, No. SUPPL. 1, 06.2004, p. 137-138.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Piroska, B, Mészáros, E & Kopp, M 2004, 'State of health related to marital status in the Hungarian population', Psychology and Health, vol. 19, no. SUPPL. 1, pp. 137-138.
Piroska, Balog ; Mészáros, Eszter ; Kopp, M. / State of health related to marital status in the Hungarian population. In: Psychology and Health. 2004 ; Vol. 19, No. SUPPL. 1. pp. 137-138.
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