Standardization of salt aggregation test for reproducible determination of cell-surface hydrophobicity with special reference to Staphylococcus species

F. Rozgonyi, K. R. Szitha, S. Hjerten, T. Wadstrom

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

24 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The laboratory conditions for reproducible routine determination of staphylococcal cell-surface hydrophobicity by the salt aggregation test were standardized. Fresh bacterial suspensions standardized to 5 x 109 cfu/ml gave the most reproducible results with both Staphylococcus aureus and coagulase-negative staphylococci. For relatively hydrophobic strains a 5-min reading time was necessary to detect bacterial aggregation in ammonium sulphate solutions ranging from 0.1 M to 1.5 M, pH 6.8. A x 10 hand lens facilitated reading aggregations. Overnight storage of bacterial suspensions at 20° C reduced cell-surface hydrophobicity of all species, while storage at 4° C reduced the hydrophobic nature of Staph. aureus strains. The hydrophobicity of coagulase-negative staphylococci rarely changed at 4° C. A 10-fold dilution of fresh, standardized bacterial suspensions made it impossible to detect bacterial aggregation in ammonium sulphate solutions even with a hand lens. Under standardized conditions three types of staphylococcal cell aggregations were observed. The first looked like the slide agglutination for O antigens of Enterobacteriaceae, the second resembled H-agglutination, while the third had a filamentous appearance. These patterns indicated that more than one component might contribute to cell-surface hydrophobicity of both Staph. aureus and coagulse-negative staphylococci, or the same component might have different position on the cell surface.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)451-457
Number of pages7
JournalJournal of Applied Bacteriology
Volume59
Issue number5
Publication statusPublished - 1985

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Hydrophobic and Hydrophilic Interactions
Staphylococcus
Salts
Suspensions
Coagulase
Agglutination
Ammonium Sulfate
Lenses
Reading
Hand
O Antigens
Cell Aggregation
antineoplaston A10
Enterobacteriaceae
Staphylococcus aureus

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Applied Microbiology and Biotechnology
  • Microbiology

Cite this

Standardization of salt aggregation test for reproducible determination of cell-surface hydrophobicity with special reference to Staphylococcus species. / Rozgonyi, F.; Szitha, K. R.; Hjerten, S.; Wadstrom, T.

In: Journal of Applied Bacteriology, Vol. 59, No. 5, 1985, p. 451-457.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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