Spiral CT colonography in inflammatory bowel disease

Zsolt Tarján, T. Zágoni, Tamás Györke, A. Mester, K. Karlinger, E. Makó

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

31 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective: Most of the studies on virtual colonoscopy are dealing with the role of detecting colorectal polyps or neoplasms. We have undertaken this study to evaluate the value of CT colonography in patients with colonic Crohn's disease. Methods and material: Five patients (three males, two females, 23-51 years, mean age 42 years) with known (4) or suspected (1) Crohn's disease of the colon underwent fiberoptic colonoscopy and CT colonography in the same day or during a 1-week period. The images were evaluated with the so called zoomed axial slice movie technique and in some regions intra- and extraluminal surface shaded and volume rendered images were generated on a separate workstation. The results were compared to those of a colonoscopy. Results: The final diagnosis was Crohn's disease in four patients and colitis ulcerosa in one. Total examination was possible by colonoscopy in two cases, and with CT colonography in all five cases. The wall of those segments severely affected by the disease were depicted by the axial CT scans to be thickened. The thick walled, segments with narrow lumen seen on CT colonography corresponded to the regions where colonoscopy was failed to pass. Air filled sinus tracts, thickening of the wall of the terminal ileum, loss of haustration pseudopolyps and deep ulcers were seen in CT colonography. Three dimensional (3D) endoluminal views demonstrated pseudopolyps similar to endoscopic images None of the colonoscopically reported shallow ulcerations or aphtoid ulcerations or granular mucosal surface were observed on 2- or 3D CT colonographic images. Conclusion: CT colonography by depicting colonic wall thickening seems to be a useful tool in the diagnosis of Crohn's colitis, which could be a single examination depicting the intraluminal, and transmural extent of the disease. (C) 2000 Elsevier Science Ireland Ltd.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)193-198
Number of pages6
JournalEuropean Journal of Radiology
Volume35
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Sep 2000

Fingerprint

Computed Tomographic Colonography
Spiral Computed Tomography
Inflammatory Bowel Diseases
Colonoscopy
Crohn Disease
Colitis
Colonic Diseases
Motion Pictures
Polyps
Ileum
Ulcer
Colon
Air

Keywords

  • Computed tomography
  • IBD, computed tomography
  • IBD, diagnosis
  • Three- dimensional
  • Virtual colonoscopy

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Radiology Nuclear Medicine and imaging

Cite this

Spiral CT colonography in inflammatory bowel disease. / Tarján, Zsolt; Zágoni, T.; Györke, Tamás; Mester, A.; Karlinger, K.; Makó, E.

In: European Journal of Radiology, Vol. 35, No. 3, 09.2000, p. 193-198.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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