Spike train dynamics predicts theta-related phase precession in hippocampal pyramidal cells

Kenneth D. Harris, Darrell A. Henze, Hajime Hirase, Xavier Leinekugel, George Dragoi, A. Czurkó, György Buzsáki

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

257 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

According to the temporal coding hypothesis, neurons encode information by the exact timing of spikes. An example of temporal coding is the hippocampal phase precession phenomenon, in which the timing of pyramidal cell spikes relative to the theta rhythm shows a unidirectional forward precession during spatial behaviour. Here we show that phase precession occurs in both spatial and non-spatial behaviours. We found that spike phase correlated with instantaneous discharge rate, and precessed unidirectionally at high rates, regardless of behaviour. The spatial phase precession phenomenon is therefore a manifestation of a more fundamental principle governing the timing of pyramidal cell discharge. We suggest that intrinsic properties of pyramidal cells have a key role in determining spike times, and that the interplay between the magnitude of dendritic excitation and rhythmic inhibition of the somatic region is responsible for the phase assignment of spikes.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)738-741
Number of pages4
JournalNature
Volume417
Issue number6890
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jun 13 2002

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Pyramidal Cells
Spatial Behavior
Theta Rhythm
Neurons

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • General

Cite this

Harris, K. D., Henze, D. A., Hirase, H., Leinekugel, X., Dragoi, G., Czurkó, A., & Buzsáki, G. (2002). Spike train dynamics predicts theta-related phase precession in hippocampal pyramidal cells. Nature, 417(6890), 738-741. https://doi.org/10.1038/nature00808

Spike train dynamics predicts theta-related phase precession in hippocampal pyramidal cells. / Harris, Kenneth D.; Henze, Darrell A.; Hirase, Hajime; Leinekugel, Xavier; Dragoi, George; Czurkó, A.; Buzsáki, György.

In: Nature, Vol. 417, No. 6890, 13.06.2002, p. 738-741.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Harris, KD, Henze, DA, Hirase, H, Leinekugel, X, Dragoi, G, Czurkó, A & Buzsáki, G 2002, 'Spike train dynamics predicts theta-related phase precession in hippocampal pyramidal cells', Nature, vol. 417, no. 6890, pp. 738-741. https://doi.org/10.1038/nature00808
Harris KD, Henze DA, Hirase H, Leinekugel X, Dragoi G, Czurkó A et al. Spike train dynamics predicts theta-related phase precession in hippocampal pyramidal cells. Nature. 2002 Jun 13;417(6890):738-741. https://doi.org/10.1038/nature00808
Harris, Kenneth D. ; Henze, Darrell A. ; Hirase, Hajime ; Leinekugel, Xavier ; Dragoi, George ; Czurkó, A. ; Buzsáki, György. / Spike train dynamics predicts theta-related phase precession in hippocampal pyramidal cells. In: Nature. 2002 ; Vol. 417, No. 6890. pp. 738-741.
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