Sperm chromatin stability in frozen-thawed semen is maintained over age in AI bulls

Triin Hallap, S. Nagy, Margareta Håård, Ülle Jaakma, Anders Johannisson, Heriberto Rodriguez-Martinez

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

37 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The aim of the present study was to investigate the effect of age of the sire on the in vitro quality of frozen-thawed (FT) bull spermatozoa, both when tested immediately postthaw (PT) and when assessed after cleansing and selection through a swim-up (SU) procedure. Semen samples from six Swedish Red and White Breed (SRB) artificial insemination (AI) bulls at age 1 and again, at 4 years were collected and frozen in 0.25 ml plastic straws. Also, semen was collected from six Estonian Holstein (EHF) bulls at the ages of 3, 5, and 7 years and likewise processed. The FT semen was tested for the susceptibility of sperm nuclear deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) to undergo acid-induced denaturation in situ, as quantified by flow cytometry (FCM). The DNA denaturability was expressed as function αt, i.e., as the ratio of red (denaturated DNA) to red + green (total cellular DNA) fluorescence intensity. The results were expressed as the percentage of cells with high αt values, i.e., cells outside the main population (% COMPαt). Morphological evaluation of the same samples was performed to detect general and sperm head abnormalities and differences between ages. Fertility results were available as non-return rates (NRRs) for the semen of the sires when they were 1 year (SRB) and 3 years (EHF) old, varying from 62.2 to 70.7% in SRB and from 52.2 to 76.0% in EHF animals. The COMPαt values ranged from 0.5-3.6% (PT) to 0.2-1.7% (SU) for SRB bulls and from 0.4-1.8% (PT) to 0.2-1.5% (SU) for EHF bulls. Both breeds lacked differences between ages, either PT or after SU. However, the SU procedure yielded a significantly higher population of spermatozoa with stable DNA following acid-induced denaturation, than PT samples (p <0.001). No correlation was detected between field fertility and chromatin stability. The results indicate that for these bull populations, the SU procedure was able to select spermatozoa with stable chromatin from the bulk samples. However, the use of DNA denaturation as a challenge to assess sperm chromatin stability did not offer a more accurate tool to evaluate sperm quality than the conventional, light microscopical evaluation of morphology.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1752-1763
Number of pages12
JournalTheriogenology
Volume63
Issue number6
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Apr 1 2005

Fingerprint

Semen Preservation
Artificial Insemination
artificial insemination
Chromatin
chromatin
Spermatozoa
semen
Swedish Red-and-White
bulls
spermatozoa
DNA
Semen
denaturation
breeds
lissamine rhodamine B
Fertility
sires
Population
Sperm Head
Acids

Keywords

  • Bull
  • Chromatin stability
  • Fertility
  • Frozen semen
  • Morphology

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Animal Science and Zoology
  • veterinary(all)

Cite this

Hallap, T., Nagy, S., Håård, M., Jaakma, Ü., Johannisson, A., & Rodriguez-Martinez, H. (2005). Sperm chromatin stability in frozen-thawed semen is maintained over age in AI bulls. Theriogenology, 63(6), 1752-1763. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.theriogenology.2004.08.001

Sperm chromatin stability in frozen-thawed semen is maintained over age in AI bulls. / Hallap, Triin; Nagy, S.; Håård, Margareta; Jaakma, Ülle; Johannisson, Anders; Rodriguez-Martinez, Heriberto.

In: Theriogenology, Vol. 63, No. 6, 01.04.2005, p. 1752-1763.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Hallap, T, Nagy, S, Håård, M, Jaakma, Ü, Johannisson, A & Rodriguez-Martinez, H 2005, 'Sperm chromatin stability in frozen-thawed semen is maintained over age in AI bulls', Theriogenology, vol. 63, no. 6, pp. 1752-1763. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.theriogenology.2004.08.001
Hallap, Triin ; Nagy, S. ; Håård, Margareta ; Jaakma, Ülle ; Johannisson, Anders ; Rodriguez-Martinez, Heriberto. / Sperm chromatin stability in frozen-thawed semen is maintained over age in AI bulls. In: Theriogenology. 2005 ; Vol. 63, No. 6. pp. 1752-1763.
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