Spatial Distribution of the Cannabinoid Type 1 and Capsaicin Receptors May Contribute to the Complexity of Their Crosstalk

Jie Chen, Angelika Varga, Srikumaran Selvarajah, Agnes Jenes, Beatrix Dienes, Joao Sousa-Valente, Akos Kulik, Gabor Veress, Susan D. Brain, David Baker, Laszlo Urban, Ken Mackie, I. Nagy

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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Abstract

The cannabinoid type 1 (CB1) receptor and the capsaicin receptor (TRPV1) exhibit co-expression and complex, but largely unknown, functional interactions in a sub-population of primary sensory neurons (PSN). We report that PSN co-expressing CB1 receptor and TRPV1 form two distinct sub-populations based on their pharmacological properties, which could be due to the distribution pattern of the two receptors. Pharmacologically, neurons respond either only to capsaicin (COR neurons) or to both capsaicin and the endogenous TRPV1 and CB1 receptor ligand anandamide (ACR neurons). Blocking or deleting the CB1 receptor only reduces both anandamide- and capsaicin-evoked responses in ACR neurons. Deleting the CB1 receptor also reduces the proportion of ACR neurons without any effect on the overall number of capsaicin-responding cells. Regarding the distribution pattern of the two receptors, neurons express CB1 and TRPV1 receptors either isolated in low densities or in close proximity with medium/high densities. We suggest that spatial distribution of the CB1 receptor and TRPV1 contributes to the complexity of their functional interaction.

Original languageEnglish
Article number33307
JournalScientific Reports
Volume6
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Sep 22 2016

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TRPV Cation Channels
Cannabinoid Receptors
Cannabinoids
Capsaicin
Neurons
Sensory Receptor Cells
Population
Pharmacology
Ligands

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • General

Cite this

Spatial Distribution of the Cannabinoid Type 1 and Capsaicin Receptors May Contribute to the Complexity of Their Crosstalk. / Chen, Jie; Varga, Angelika; Selvarajah, Srikumaran; Jenes, Agnes; Dienes, Beatrix; Sousa-Valente, Joao; Kulik, Akos; Veress, Gabor; Brain, Susan D.; Baker, David; Urban, Laszlo; Mackie, Ken; Nagy, I.

In: Scientific Reports, Vol. 6, 33307, 22.09.2016.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Chen, J, Varga, A, Selvarajah, S, Jenes, A, Dienes, B, Sousa-Valente, J, Kulik, A, Veress, G, Brain, SD, Baker, D, Urban, L, Mackie, K & Nagy, I 2016, 'Spatial Distribution of the Cannabinoid Type 1 and Capsaicin Receptors May Contribute to the Complexity of Their Crosstalk', Scientific Reports, vol. 6, 33307. https://doi.org/10.1038/srep33307
Chen, Jie ; Varga, Angelika ; Selvarajah, Srikumaran ; Jenes, Agnes ; Dienes, Beatrix ; Sousa-Valente, Joao ; Kulik, Akos ; Veress, Gabor ; Brain, Susan D. ; Baker, David ; Urban, Laszlo ; Mackie, Ken ; Nagy, I. / Spatial Distribution of the Cannabinoid Type 1 and Capsaicin Receptors May Contribute to the Complexity of Their Crosstalk. In: Scientific Reports. 2016 ; Vol. 6.
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