Spatial distribution of carabids along grass-forest transects

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

25 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Spatial distribution of ground-beetles and associations between carabids and environmental variables were studied in grass-forest transects in the Aggtelek National Park in Hungary. The carabid assemblages of the grass, the forest edge and the forest interior can be separated from each other by principal coordinates analysis, suggesting that all habitats have a characteristic and distinct species composition. The collected carabid species can be divided into five groups by indicator species analysis: (1) habitat generalists, (2) forest generalists, (3) species of the grass, (4) forest edge species, and (5) forest specialists. Distributions of the eighteen most frequent carabids were generally aggregated. There were significant correlations between the carabid abundance and the following abiotic factors: relative cover of the leaf litter, the herbs, the shrubs, and the canopy layer. Biotic factors, like the abundance of the carabids' prey, and the occurrence of other carabids were also correlated significantly with the distribution of particular species at the studied spatial scale. For the eighteen most frequent species we found 7 significant positive and 4 significant negative correlations of the abundance patterns. For two species (Molops piceus (PANZER, 1793) and Pterostichus burmeisteri HEER, 1841), which are of similar size, spatial pattern and seasonal activity, we found significant negative interaction suggesting interspecific competition between them. The results stress the importance of an integration of biotic and abiotic factors in carabid ecology, and also provide an empirical approach for understanding spatial distribution of carabids.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1-17
Number of pages17
JournalActa Zoologica Academiae Scientiarum Hungaricae
Volume46
Issue number1
Publication statusPublished - 2000

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spatial distribution
grasses
edge effects
environmental factors
Pterostichus
Carabidae
interspecific competition
habitats
Hungary
plant litter
indicator species
herbs
national parks
biogeography
shrubs
canopy
ecology
species diversity
biotic factors
multidimensional scaling

Keywords

  • Aggregation indices
  • Community organisation
  • Forest edge
  • Indicator species

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Animal Science and Zoology

Cite this

Spatial distribution of carabids along grass-forest transects. / Magura, T.; Tóthmérész, B.; Molnár, T.

In: Acta Zoologica Academiae Scientiarum Hungaricae, Vol. 46, No. 1, 2000, p. 1-17.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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