Spatial clustering of childhood acute lymphoblastic leukaemia in Hungary

T. Nyári, G. Ottóffy, K. Bartyik, L. Thurzó, N. Solymosi, G. Cserni, L. Parker, R. J Q McNally

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

8 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The aetiology of childhood acute lymphoblastic leukaemia has been linked with spatially heterogeneous environmental exposures. The presence of spatial clustering would be consistent with geographically localized environmental exposures over long periods of time. The present study is the first to examine spatial clustering amongst children aged 0-4 years using population-based data from Hungary. The data set consisted of 134 children diagnosed with acute lymphoblastic leukaemia who were resident in part of Hungary during the period 1981-2000. Two levels of spatial aggregation were examined: counties and settlements. The Potthoff-Whittinghill and Moran I autocorrelation methods were used to test for spatial clustering. Additionally, an evaluation of the environmental changes during the study period was considered. Specifically analyses were carried out on sub-periods to investigate a possible effect of the Chernobyl catastrophe. There was statistically significant spatial clustering both at the county (estimate of extra-Poisson variation β̂=0.56, P = 0.04) and settlement levels (estimate of extra-Poisson variation β ̂=0.68, P = 0.0003). At county level, the finding was attributable to clustering amongst female cases, but at settlement level, the finding was limited to male cases. There was significant spatial autocorrelation in the sub-periods immediately following the accident (1986-1990 & 1991-1995), but not before 1986, nor after 1995. A significant autocorrelation was observed during the 5 year period immediately following the accident (1986-1990, global Moran I = 0.1334, p = 0.005). The centre of significant excesses of ALL cases was located in the county of Baranya. Our study is consistent with an environmental aetiology for acute lymphoblastic leukaemia in children associated with constant exposure to an, as yet unknown, environmental factor in small geographical areas. Although a possible effect of the Chernobyl accident was found in the autocorrelation analysis, the role of chance cannot be excluded.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)297-302
Number of pages6
JournalPathology and Oncology Research
Volume19
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Apr 2013

Fingerprint

Hungary
Precursor Cell Lymphoblastic Leukemia-Lymphoma
Cluster Analysis
Accidents
Environmental Exposure
Spatial Analysis
Population

Keywords

  • Acute lymphoblastic leukaemia
  • Aetiology
  • Childhood
  • Cluster analysis
  • Environmental exposure
  • Gender specific effect
  • Male predominance
  • Spatial distribution

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Cancer Research
  • Oncology
  • Pathology and Forensic Medicine

Cite this

Spatial clustering of childhood acute lymphoblastic leukaemia in Hungary. / Nyári, T.; Ottóffy, G.; Bartyik, K.; Thurzó, L.; Solymosi, N.; Cserni, G.; Parker, L.; McNally, R. J Q.

In: Pathology and Oncology Research, Vol. 19, No. 2, 04.2013, p. 297-302.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Nyári, T. ; Ottóffy, G. ; Bartyik, K. ; Thurzó, L. ; Solymosi, N. ; Cserni, G. ; Parker, L. ; McNally, R. J Q. / Spatial clustering of childhood acute lymphoblastic leukaemia in Hungary. In: Pathology and Oncology Research. 2013 ; Vol. 19, No. 2. pp. 297-302.
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