Sources and geographic origin of particulate matter in urban areas of the Danube macro-region: The cases of Zagreb (Croatia), Budapest (Hungary) and Sofia (Bulgaria)

M. G. Perrone, S. Vratolis, E. Georgieva, S. Török, K. Šega, B. Veleva, J. Osán, I. Bešlić, Z. Kertész, D. Pernigotti, K. Eleftheriadis, C. A. Belis

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

9 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The contribution of main PM pollution sources and their geographic origin in three urban sites of the Danube macro-region (Zagreb, Budapest and Sofia) were determined by combining receptor and Lagrangian models. The source contribution estimates were obtained with the Positive Matrix Factorization (PMF) receptor model and the results were further examined using local wind data and backward trajectories obtained with FLEXPART. Potential Source Contribution Function (PSCF) analysis was applied to identify the geographical source areas for the PM sources subject to long-range transport. Gas-to-particle transformation processes and primary emissions from biomass burning are the most important contributors to PM in the studied sites followed by re-suspension of soil (crustal material) and traffic. These four sources can be considered typical of the Danube macro-region because they were identified in all the studied locations. Long-range transport was observed of: a) sulphate-enriched aged aerosols, deriving from SO2 emissions in combustion processes in the Balkans and Eastern Europe and b) dust from the Saharan and Karakum deserts. The study highlights that PM pollution in the studied urban areas of the Danube macro-region is the result of both local sources and long-range transport from both EU and no-EU areas.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1515-1529
Number of pages15
JournalScience of the Total Environment
Volume619-620
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Apr 1 2018

Fingerprint

Particulate Matter
long range transport
Macros
particulate matter
urban area
Pollution
urban site
biomass burning
pollutant source
Aerosols
Factorization
resuspension
Sulfates
Dust
Suspensions
Biomass
desert
combustion
Gases
trajectory

Keywords

  • Danube macro-region
  • FLEXPART
  • Long-range transport
  • PMF
  • PSCF
  • Source apportionment

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Environmental Engineering
  • Environmental Chemistry
  • Waste Management and Disposal
  • Pollution

Cite this

Sources and geographic origin of particulate matter in urban areas of the Danube macro-region : The cases of Zagreb (Croatia), Budapest (Hungary) and Sofia (Bulgaria). / Perrone, M. G.; Vratolis, S.; Georgieva, E.; Török, S.; Šega, K.; Veleva, B.; Osán, J.; Bešlić, I.; Kertész, Z.; Pernigotti, D.; Eleftheriadis, K.; Belis, C. A.

In: Science of the Total Environment, Vol. 619-620, 01.04.2018, p. 1515-1529.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Perrone, M. G. ; Vratolis, S. ; Georgieva, E. ; Török, S. ; Šega, K. ; Veleva, B. ; Osán, J. ; Bešlić, I. ; Kertész, Z. ; Pernigotti, D. ; Eleftheriadis, K. ; Belis, C. A. / Sources and geographic origin of particulate matter in urban areas of the Danube macro-region : The cases of Zagreb (Croatia), Budapest (Hungary) and Sofia (Bulgaria). In: Science of the Total Environment. 2018 ; Vol. 619-620. pp. 1515-1529.
@article{f5bddd2143b64469970b84e5e1af61f2,
title = "Sources and geographic origin of particulate matter in urban areas of the Danube macro-region: The cases of Zagreb (Croatia), Budapest (Hungary) and Sofia (Bulgaria)",
abstract = "The contribution of main PM pollution sources and their geographic origin in three urban sites of the Danube macro-region (Zagreb, Budapest and Sofia) were determined by combining receptor and Lagrangian models. The source contribution estimates were obtained with the Positive Matrix Factorization (PMF) receptor model and the results were further examined using local wind data and backward trajectories obtained with FLEXPART. Potential Source Contribution Function (PSCF) analysis was applied to identify the geographical source areas for the PM sources subject to long-range transport. Gas-to-particle transformation processes and primary emissions from biomass burning are the most important contributors to PM in the studied sites followed by re-suspension of soil (crustal material) and traffic. These four sources can be considered typical of the Danube macro-region because they were identified in all the studied locations. Long-range transport was observed of: a) sulphate-enriched aged aerosols, deriving from SO2 emissions in combustion processes in the Balkans and Eastern Europe and b) dust from the Saharan and Karakum deserts. The study highlights that PM pollution in the studied urban areas of the Danube macro-region is the result of both local sources and long-range transport from both EU and no-EU areas.",
keywords = "Danube macro-region, FLEXPART, Long-range transport, PMF, PSCF, Source apportionment",
author = "Perrone, {M. G.} and S. Vratolis and E. Georgieva and S. T{\"o}r{\"o}k and K. Šega and B. Veleva and J. Os{\'a}n and I. Bešlić and Z. Kert{\'e}sz and D. Pernigotti and K. Eleftheriadis and Belis, {C. A.}",
year = "2018",
month = "4",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1016/j.scitotenv.2017.11.092",
language = "English",
volume = "619-620",
pages = "1515--1529",
journal = "Science of the Total Environment",
issn = "0048-9697",
publisher = "Elsevier",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Sources and geographic origin of particulate matter in urban areas of the Danube macro-region

T2 - The cases of Zagreb (Croatia), Budapest (Hungary) and Sofia (Bulgaria)

AU - Perrone, M. G.

AU - Vratolis, S.

AU - Georgieva, E.

AU - Török, S.

AU - Šega, K.

AU - Veleva, B.

AU - Osán, J.

AU - Bešlić, I.

AU - Kertész, Z.

AU - Pernigotti, D.

AU - Eleftheriadis, K.

AU - Belis, C. A.

PY - 2018/4/1

Y1 - 2018/4/1

N2 - The contribution of main PM pollution sources and their geographic origin in three urban sites of the Danube macro-region (Zagreb, Budapest and Sofia) were determined by combining receptor and Lagrangian models. The source contribution estimates were obtained with the Positive Matrix Factorization (PMF) receptor model and the results were further examined using local wind data and backward trajectories obtained with FLEXPART. Potential Source Contribution Function (PSCF) analysis was applied to identify the geographical source areas for the PM sources subject to long-range transport. Gas-to-particle transformation processes and primary emissions from biomass burning are the most important contributors to PM in the studied sites followed by re-suspension of soil (crustal material) and traffic. These four sources can be considered typical of the Danube macro-region because they were identified in all the studied locations. Long-range transport was observed of: a) sulphate-enriched aged aerosols, deriving from SO2 emissions in combustion processes in the Balkans and Eastern Europe and b) dust from the Saharan and Karakum deserts. The study highlights that PM pollution in the studied urban areas of the Danube macro-region is the result of both local sources and long-range transport from both EU and no-EU areas.

AB - The contribution of main PM pollution sources and their geographic origin in three urban sites of the Danube macro-region (Zagreb, Budapest and Sofia) were determined by combining receptor and Lagrangian models. The source contribution estimates were obtained with the Positive Matrix Factorization (PMF) receptor model and the results were further examined using local wind data and backward trajectories obtained with FLEXPART. Potential Source Contribution Function (PSCF) analysis was applied to identify the geographical source areas for the PM sources subject to long-range transport. Gas-to-particle transformation processes and primary emissions from biomass burning are the most important contributors to PM in the studied sites followed by re-suspension of soil (crustal material) and traffic. These four sources can be considered typical of the Danube macro-region because they were identified in all the studied locations. Long-range transport was observed of: a) sulphate-enriched aged aerosols, deriving from SO2 emissions in combustion processes in the Balkans and Eastern Europe and b) dust from the Saharan and Karakum deserts. The study highlights that PM pollution in the studied urban areas of the Danube macro-region is the result of both local sources and long-range transport from both EU and no-EU areas.

KW - Danube macro-region

KW - FLEXPART

KW - Long-range transport

KW - PMF

KW - PSCF

KW - Source apportionment

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85036628522&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=85036628522&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1016/j.scitotenv.2017.11.092

DO - 10.1016/j.scitotenv.2017.11.092

M3 - Article

AN - SCOPUS:85036628522

VL - 619-620

SP - 1515

EP - 1529

JO - Science of the Total Environment

JF - Science of the Total Environment

SN - 0048-9697

ER -