Sonochemical synthesis of inorganic nanoparticles

J. Kis-Csitári, Z. Kónya, I. Kiricsi

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

6 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Sonochemistry has applications across almost the whole breadth of chemistry. A number of theories were developed in order to explain how a 20 kHz sonic radiation can break chemical bonds. They all agree that main event in sonochemistry is cavitation, in other words the creation, growth and collapse of bubbles (so called hot spots) formed in the liquid. These hot spots have temperatures of roughly 5,000°C, pressures of about 500 atmospheres, and heating and cooling rates greater than 109 K/s. The enormous local temperature, pressure and the extraordinary heating/cooling rates generated by cavitational collapse provides an unusual mechanism for generating high energy chemistry. A novel sonochemical method for the continuous preparation of metal- and metal-oxide nanocrystalline materials has been developed. The products were characterized by transmission electron microscopy. We observed that the choice of the source metal salt, the reactant and the optimal usage of high-power ultrasound are both important in the formation of the nanostructures.

Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationNATO Science for Peace and Security Series B: Physics and Biophysics
Pages369-372
Number of pages4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2008

Publication series

NameNATO Science for Peace and Security Series B: Physics and Biophysics
ISSN (Print)18746500

Fingerprint

Synthetic Chemistry Techniques
ultrasonic processing
Sonochemistry
Nanoparticles
Metals
chemistry
cooling
Heating
nanoparticles
heating
synthesis
chemical bonds
cavitation flow
metals
Cooling
metal oxides
Pressure
Nanocrystalline materials
nanocrystals
Temperature

Keywords

  • Cavitation
  • Nanoparticles
  • Sonochemistry

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biophysics
  • Biotechnology
  • Physics and Astronomy(all)
  • Electrical and Electronic Engineering

Cite this

Kis-Csitári, J., Kónya, Z., & Kiricsi, I. (2008). Sonochemical synthesis of inorganic nanoparticles. In NATO Science for Peace and Security Series B: Physics and Biophysics (pp. 369-372). (NATO Science for Peace and Security Series B: Physics and Biophysics). https://doi.org/10.1007/978-1-4020-8903-9-33

Sonochemical synthesis of inorganic nanoparticles. / Kis-Csitári, J.; Kónya, Z.; Kiricsi, I.

NATO Science for Peace and Security Series B: Physics and Biophysics. 2008. p. 369-372 (NATO Science for Peace and Security Series B: Physics and Biophysics).

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

Kis-Csitári, J, Kónya, Z & Kiricsi, I 2008, Sonochemical synthesis of inorganic nanoparticles. in NATO Science for Peace and Security Series B: Physics and Biophysics. NATO Science for Peace and Security Series B: Physics and Biophysics, pp. 369-372. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-1-4020-8903-9-33
Kis-Csitári J, Kónya Z, Kiricsi I. Sonochemical synthesis of inorganic nanoparticles. In NATO Science for Peace and Security Series B: Physics and Biophysics. 2008. p. 369-372. (NATO Science for Peace and Security Series B: Physics and Biophysics). https://doi.org/10.1007/978-1-4020-8903-9-33
Kis-Csitári, J. ; Kónya, Z. ; Kiricsi, I. / Sonochemical synthesis of inorganic nanoparticles. NATO Science for Peace and Security Series B: Physics and Biophysics. 2008. pp. 369-372 (NATO Science for Peace and Security Series B: Physics and Biophysics).
@inbook{f76666ef80364790a9b8bec5121e6c65,
title = "Sonochemical synthesis of inorganic nanoparticles",
abstract = "Sonochemistry has applications across almost the whole breadth of chemistry. A number of theories were developed in order to explain how a 20 kHz sonic radiation can break chemical bonds. They all agree that main event in sonochemistry is cavitation, in other words the creation, growth and collapse of bubbles (so called hot spots) formed in the liquid. These hot spots have temperatures of roughly 5,000°C, pressures of about 500 atmospheres, and heating and cooling rates greater than 109 K/s. The enormous local temperature, pressure and the extraordinary heating/cooling rates generated by cavitational collapse provides an unusual mechanism for generating high energy chemistry. A novel sonochemical method for the continuous preparation of metal- and metal-oxide nanocrystalline materials has been developed. The products were characterized by transmission electron microscopy. We observed that the choice of the source metal salt, the reactant and the optimal usage of high-power ultrasound are both important in the formation of the nanostructures.",
keywords = "Cavitation, Nanoparticles, Sonochemistry",
author = "J. Kis-Csit{\'a}ri and Z. K{\'o}nya and I. Kiricsi",
year = "2008",
doi = "10.1007/978-1-4020-8903-9-33",
language = "English",
isbn = "9781402089022",
series = "NATO Science for Peace and Security Series B: Physics and Biophysics",
pages = "369--372",
booktitle = "NATO Science for Peace and Security Series B: Physics and Biophysics",

}

TY - CHAP

T1 - Sonochemical synthesis of inorganic nanoparticles

AU - Kis-Csitári, J.

AU - Kónya, Z.

AU - Kiricsi, I.

PY - 2008

Y1 - 2008

N2 - Sonochemistry has applications across almost the whole breadth of chemistry. A number of theories were developed in order to explain how a 20 kHz sonic radiation can break chemical bonds. They all agree that main event in sonochemistry is cavitation, in other words the creation, growth and collapse of bubbles (so called hot spots) formed in the liquid. These hot spots have temperatures of roughly 5,000°C, pressures of about 500 atmospheres, and heating and cooling rates greater than 109 K/s. The enormous local temperature, pressure and the extraordinary heating/cooling rates generated by cavitational collapse provides an unusual mechanism for generating high energy chemistry. A novel sonochemical method for the continuous preparation of metal- and metal-oxide nanocrystalline materials has been developed. The products were characterized by transmission electron microscopy. We observed that the choice of the source metal salt, the reactant and the optimal usage of high-power ultrasound are both important in the formation of the nanostructures.

AB - Sonochemistry has applications across almost the whole breadth of chemistry. A number of theories were developed in order to explain how a 20 kHz sonic radiation can break chemical bonds. They all agree that main event in sonochemistry is cavitation, in other words the creation, growth and collapse of bubbles (so called hot spots) formed in the liquid. These hot spots have temperatures of roughly 5,000°C, pressures of about 500 atmospheres, and heating and cooling rates greater than 109 K/s. The enormous local temperature, pressure and the extraordinary heating/cooling rates generated by cavitational collapse provides an unusual mechanism for generating high energy chemistry. A novel sonochemical method for the continuous preparation of metal- and metal-oxide nanocrystalline materials has been developed. The products were characterized by transmission electron microscopy. We observed that the choice of the source metal salt, the reactant and the optimal usage of high-power ultrasound are both important in the formation of the nanostructures.

KW - Cavitation

KW - Nanoparticles

KW - Sonochemistry

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=77949466280&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=77949466280&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1007/978-1-4020-8903-9-33

DO - 10.1007/978-1-4020-8903-9-33

M3 - Chapter

SN - 9781402089022

T3 - NATO Science for Peace and Security Series B: Physics and Biophysics

SP - 369

EP - 372

BT - NATO Science for Peace and Security Series B: Physics and Biophysics

ER -