Some practical applications of elastic peak electron spectroscopy

C. Jardin, G. Gergely, B. Gruzza

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

15 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Practical applications of elastic peak electron spectroscopy (EPES) are presented to demonstrate the advantages of this technique in the study of materials subjected to electron beam degradation and surfaces involving hydrogen species. Beam damage on phthalocyanine layers is detected at low beam power (Ep = 500 eV, Jp = 10-3 A cm-2, grazing incidence angle 20°) with a cross-section of about 8 × 10-18 cm2, as deduced from EPES experiments. The change in the emission yield of elastically reflected electrons during electron irradiation of this 'fragile' molecular material is related to an increase in the mean atomic number due to breaking of CH bonds and to desorption of hydrogen. Using very low current density to prevent primary beam effects, the distinction between different metal phthalocyanine layers (PcZn and Pc2Lu) and the study of diffusion induced by heat treatments are possible by EPES, in contrast to AES and EELS (electron energy loss spectroscopy) techniques. Application of EPES to the analysis of titanium alloy TA6V submitted to a hydrolysis treatment in hot water is also reported. The enhancement in elastic scattering with decreasing primary energy suggest that hydrogen is present at the surface of the hydrolysed sample.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)5-8
Number of pages4
JournalSurface and Interface Analysis
Volume19
Issue number1-12
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jun 1 1992

Fingerprint

Electron spectroscopy
electron spectroscopy
Hydrogen
hydrogen
Electron irradiation
Elastic scattering
Electron energy loss spectroscopy
titanium alloys
electron irradiation
low currents
grazing incidence
Titanium alloys
hydrolysis
Electron beams
Hydrolysis
Desorption
elastic scattering
heat treatment
Current density
energy dissipation

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Chemistry(all)
  • Condensed Matter Physics
  • Surfaces and Interfaces
  • Materials Chemistry
  • Surfaces, Coatings and Films

Cite this

Some practical applications of elastic peak electron spectroscopy. / Jardin, C.; Gergely, G.; Gruzza, B.

In: Surface and Interface Analysis, Vol. 19, No. 1-12, 01.06.1992, p. 5-8.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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