Some complexities of metabolic regulation

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

23 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

I have attempted to present a view of metabolic control mechanisms which de-emphasizes the idea that regulation of a metabooic pathway occurs at a single sensitive point. With lipogenesis as an example, I have indicated not only that control is possible at each step in the sequence but each step can be controlled in a variety of ways. Since many metabolites are found to have a large number of different roles, changes in concentration of a single metabolite will have a multitude of metabolic consequences. I have also pointed out that simple chemical interactions between metabolites make it very difficult to assess what change in concentration of an effective species occurs under a given set of conditions. When I related the maximum rates of enzymes of lipogenesis and the overall rate of tissue lipogenesis as well as the maximum rates each of the Krebs cycle enzymes and tissue respiration, it appeared that many steps may be rate-limiting so that control is, from this point of view as well, possible at several points. Before further progress can be made in understanding the basic features of metabolic control in animal cells, at least one important technical development must be made. It will be necessary to measure instantaneous substrate concentration in each compartment of the cell. Then the changes in concentration of a large number of possible effectors can be followed and related to the change in rate of a given metabolic path. It seems to me that one of the characteristics of animal metabolism is the high degree of complexity and its large number of interactions between the various substrates, effectors, and enzymes. It is probably these multiplicities of interactions that enables the tightness and stability of control typical of animal cells.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)61-72
Number of pages12
JournalBiochemical Medicine
Volume3
Issue number1
Publication statusPublished - Aug 1969

Fingerprint

Lipogenesis
Metabolites
Enzymes
Animals
Citric Acid Cycle
Cells
Tissue
Respiration
Substrates
Metabolism

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biochemistry

Cite this

Some complexities of metabolic regulation. / Srere, P.

In: Biochemical Medicine, Vol. 3, No. 1, 08.1969, p. 61-72.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

@article{ff2696c9a41347aba7b8ba74ac9364df,
title = "Some complexities of metabolic regulation",
abstract = "I have attempted to present a view of metabolic control mechanisms which de-emphasizes the idea that regulation of a metabooic pathway occurs at a single sensitive point. With lipogenesis as an example, I have indicated not only that control is possible at each step in the sequence but each step can be controlled in a variety of ways. Since many metabolites are found to have a large number of different roles, changes in concentration of a single metabolite will have a multitude of metabolic consequences. I have also pointed out that simple chemical interactions between metabolites make it very difficult to assess what change in concentration of an effective species occurs under a given set of conditions. When I related the maximum rates of enzymes of lipogenesis and the overall rate of tissue lipogenesis as well as the maximum rates each of the Krebs cycle enzymes and tissue respiration, it appeared that many steps may be rate-limiting so that control is, from this point of view as well, possible at several points. Before further progress can be made in understanding the basic features of metabolic control in animal cells, at least one important technical development must be made. It will be necessary to measure instantaneous substrate concentration in each compartment of the cell. Then the changes in concentration of a large number of possible effectors can be followed and related to the change in rate of a given metabolic path. It seems to me that one of the characteristics of animal metabolism is the high degree of complexity and its large number of interactions between the various substrates, effectors, and enzymes. It is probably these multiplicities of interactions that enables the tightness and stability of control typical of animal cells.",
author = "P. Srere",
year = "1969",
month = "8",
language = "English",
volume = "3",
pages = "61--72",
journal = "Molecular Genetics and Metabolism",
issn = "1096-7192",
publisher = "Academic Press Inc.",
number = "1",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Some complexities of metabolic regulation

AU - Srere, P.

PY - 1969/8

Y1 - 1969/8

N2 - I have attempted to present a view of metabolic control mechanisms which de-emphasizes the idea that regulation of a metabooic pathway occurs at a single sensitive point. With lipogenesis as an example, I have indicated not only that control is possible at each step in the sequence but each step can be controlled in a variety of ways. Since many metabolites are found to have a large number of different roles, changes in concentration of a single metabolite will have a multitude of metabolic consequences. I have also pointed out that simple chemical interactions between metabolites make it very difficult to assess what change in concentration of an effective species occurs under a given set of conditions. When I related the maximum rates of enzymes of lipogenesis and the overall rate of tissue lipogenesis as well as the maximum rates each of the Krebs cycle enzymes and tissue respiration, it appeared that many steps may be rate-limiting so that control is, from this point of view as well, possible at several points. Before further progress can be made in understanding the basic features of metabolic control in animal cells, at least one important technical development must be made. It will be necessary to measure instantaneous substrate concentration in each compartment of the cell. Then the changes in concentration of a large number of possible effectors can be followed and related to the change in rate of a given metabolic path. It seems to me that one of the characteristics of animal metabolism is the high degree of complexity and its large number of interactions between the various substrates, effectors, and enzymes. It is probably these multiplicities of interactions that enables the tightness and stability of control typical of animal cells.

AB - I have attempted to present a view of metabolic control mechanisms which de-emphasizes the idea that regulation of a metabooic pathway occurs at a single sensitive point. With lipogenesis as an example, I have indicated not only that control is possible at each step in the sequence but each step can be controlled in a variety of ways. Since many metabolites are found to have a large number of different roles, changes in concentration of a single metabolite will have a multitude of metabolic consequences. I have also pointed out that simple chemical interactions between metabolites make it very difficult to assess what change in concentration of an effective species occurs under a given set of conditions. When I related the maximum rates of enzymes of lipogenesis and the overall rate of tissue lipogenesis as well as the maximum rates each of the Krebs cycle enzymes and tissue respiration, it appeared that many steps may be rate-limiting so that control is, from this point of view as well, possible at several points. Before further progress can be made in understanding the basic features of metabolic control in animal cells, at least one important technical development must be made. It will be necessary to measure instantaneous substrate concentration in each compartment of the cell. Then the changes in concentration of a large number of possible effectors can be followed and related to the change in rate of a given metabolic path. It seems to me that one of the characteristics of animal metabolism is the high degree of complexity and its large number of interactions between the various substrates, effectors, and enzymes. It is probably these multiplicities of interactions that enables the tightness and stability of control typical of animal cells.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=49849121545&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=49849121545&partnerID=8YFLogxK

M3 - Article

AN - SCOPUS:49849121545

VL - 3

SP - 61

EP - 72

JO - Molecular Genetics and Metabolism

JF - Molecular Genetics and Metabolism

SN - 1096-7192

IS - 1

ER -