Sodium and potassium concentrations of red blood cells and plasma in children with nephrotic syndrome, uraemia and pyelonephritis.

Z. Toldi, S. Túri

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

The sodium and potassium concentrations of the red blood cells and the plasma in 38 children with pyelonephritis (19 acute, 10 chronic and 9 healed), 5 children with uraemia, and 20 children with nephrotic syndrome were compared with those of control children. The red blood cell sodium concentration was lower in patients with acute pyelonephritis, uraemia, and steroid-treated nephrotic syndrome, and higher in those with chronic pyelonephritis and nephrotic syndrome not treated with steroids. Except in uraemic cases, these alterations were not accompanied by plasma sodium and potassium changes. The results might be explained by pathological Na+ and K+ transport processes in the red cell membrane. The possible role of extracellular fluid volume changes, sodium loss and water retention are discussed.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)283-288
Number of pages6
JournalActa Paediatrica Hungarica
Volume27
Issue number4
Publication statusPublished - 1986

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Uremia
Pyelonephritis
Nephrotic Syndrome
Potassium
Erythrocytes
Sodium
Steroids
Extracellular Fluid
Cell Membrane
Water

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

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