Social Interaction with an "unidentified Moving Object" Elicits A-Not-B Error in Domestic Dogs

Anna Gergely, Anna B. Compton, Ruth C. Newberry, A. Miklósi

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

5 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Mechanical "unidentified moving objects" (UMO's) are useful for controlled investigations into features of social interaction that generate cooperativeness and positive social affiliation in domestic dogs (Canis familiaris). We hypothesized that, if a UMO interacted socially with a dog, the UMO would become associated with certain social cues and would subsequently affect dog behaviour. We assigned dogs to a Human, Social UMO or Non-Social UMO partner. In the Human and Social UMO conditions, the partner interacted with the dog cooperatively whereas the Non-Social UMO partner was unresponsive to the dog's actions. We then tested dogs with their partner in a Piagetian A-not-B error paradigm, predicting that the Human and Social UMO partners would be more likely to elicit A-not-B errors in dogs than the Non-Social UMO partner. Five trials were conducted in which the dog watched its partner hide a ball behind one of two screens (A or B). As predicted, dogs in the Human and Social UMO conditions were more likely to search for the ball behind the A screen during B trials than dogs in the Non-Social UMO condition. These results reveal that the unfamiliar partner's social responsiveness leads rapidly to accepting information communicated by the partner. This study has generated a better understanding of crucial features of agents that promote dog social behaviour, which will facilitate the programming of robots for various cooperative tasks.

Original languageEnglish
Article numbere0151600
JournalPLoS One
Volume11
Issue number4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Apr 1 2016

Fingerprint

Interpersonal Relations
Dogs
dogs
Robots
robots
Social Behavior
social behavior
cooperatives
Cues

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Agricultural and Biological Sciences(all)
  • Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology(all)
  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Social Interaction with an "unidentified Moving Object" Elicits A-Not-B Error in Domestic Dogs. / Gergely, Anna; Compton, Anna B.; Newberry, Ruth C.; Miklósi, A.

In: PLoS One, Vol. 11, No. 4, e0151600, 01.04.2016.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Gergely, Anna ; Compton, Anna B. ; Newberry, Ruth C. ; Miklósi, A. / Social Interaction with an "unidentified Moving Object" Elicits A-Not-B Error in Domestic Dogs. In: PLoS One. 2016 ; Vol. 11, No. 4.
@article{8f313e06a4364c098df73a765c78eaa7,
title = "Social Interaction with an {"}unidentified Moving Object{"} Elicits A-Not-B Error in Domestic Dogs",
abstract = "Mechanical {"}unidentified moving objects{"} (UMO's) are useful for controlled investigations into features of social interaction that generate cooperativeness and positive social affiliation in domestic dogs (Canis familiaris). We hypothesized that, if a UMO interacted socially with a dog, the UMO would become associated with certain social cues and would subsequently affect dog behaviour. We assigned dogs to a Human, Social UMO or Non-Social UMO partner. In the Human and Social UMO conditions, the partner interacted with the dog cooperatively whereas the Non-Social UMO partner was unresponsive to the dog's actions. We then tested dogs with their partner in a Piagetian A-not-B error paradigm, predicting that the Human and Social UMO partners would be more likely to elicit A-not-B errors in dogs than the Non-Social UMO partner. Five trials were conducted in which the dog watched its partner hide a ball behind one of two screens (A or B). As predicted, dogs in the Human and Social UMO conditions were more likely to search for the ball behind the A screen during B trials than dogs in the Non-Social UMO condition. These results reveal that the unfamiliar partner's social responsiveness leads rapidly to accepting information communicated by the partner. This study has generated a better understanding of crucial features of agents that promote dog social behaviour, which will facilitate the programming of robots for various cooperative tasks.",
author = "Anna Gergely and Compton, {Anna B.} and Newberry, {Ruth C.} and A. Mikl{\'o}si",
year = "2016",
month = "4",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1371/journal.pone.0151600",
language = "English",
volume = "11",
journal = "PLoS One",
issn = "1932-6203",
publisher = "Public Library of Science",
number = "4",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Social Interaction with an "unidentified Moving Object" Elicits A-Not-B Error in Domestic Dogs

AU - Gergely, Anna

AU - Compton, Anna B.

AU - Newberry, Ruth C.

AU - Miklósi, A.

PY - 2016/4/1

Y1 - 2016/4/1

N2 - Mechanical "unidentified moving objects" (UMO's) are useful for controlled investigations into features of social interaction that generate cooperativeness and positive social affiliation in domestic dogs (Canis familiaris). We hypothesized that, if a UMO interacted socially with a dog, the UMO would become associated with certain social cues and would subsequently affect dog behaviour. We assigned dogs to a Human, Social UMO or Non-Social UMO partner. In the Human and Social UMO conditions, the partner interacted with the dog cooperatively whereas the Non-Social UMO partner was unresponsive to the dog's actions. We then tested dogs with their partner in a Piagetian A-not-B error paradigm, predicting that the Human and Social UMO partners would be more likely to elicit A-not-B errors in dogs than the Non-Social UMO partner. Five trials were conducted in which the dog watched its partner hide a ball behind one of two screens (A or B). As predicted, dogs in the Human and Social UMO conditions were more likely to search for the ball behind the A screen during B trials than dogs in the Non-Social UMO condition. These results reveal that the unfamiliar partner's social responsiveness leads rapidly to accepting information communicated by the partner. This study has generated a better understanding of crucial features of agents that promote dog social behaviour, which will facilitate the programming of robots for various cooperative tasks.

AB - Mechanical "unidentified moving objects" (UMO's) are useful for controlled investigations into features of social interaction that generate cooperativeness and positive social affiliation in domestic dogs (Canis familiaris). We hypothesized that, if a UMO interacted socially with a dog, the UMO would become associated with certain social cues and would subsequently affect dog behaviour. We assigned dogs to a Human, Social UMO or Non-Social UMO partner. In the Human and Social UMO conditions, the partner interacted with the dog cooperatively whereas the Non-Social UMO partner was unresponsive to the dog's actions. We then tested dogs with their partner in a Piagetian A-not-B error paradigm, predicting that the Human and Social UMO partners would be more likely to elicit A-not-B errors in dogs than the Non-Social UMO partner. Five trials were conducted in which the dog watched its partner hide a ball behind one of two screens (A or B). As predicted, dogs in the Human and Social UMO conditions were more likely to search for the ball behind the A screen during B trials than dogs in the Non-Social UMO condition. These results reveal that the unfamiliar partner's social responsiveness leads rapidly to accepting information communicated by the partner. This study has generated a better understanding of crucial features of agents that promote dog social behaviour, which will facilitate the programming of robots for various cooperative tasks.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84963859157&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=84963859157&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1371/journal.pone.0151600

DO - 10.1371/journal.pone.0151600

M3 - Article

C2 - 27073867

AN - SCOPUS:84963859157

VL - 11

JO - PLoS One

JF - PLoS One

SN - 1932-6203

IS - 4

M1 - e0151600

ER -