Smoking and metabolism phenotype interact with inorganic arsenic in causing bladder cancer

ASHRAM Study Group

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Abstract

This study aimed to quantify bladder cancer relative risks in relation to inorganic arsenic (As) exposure below 100 μg/L in drinking water and the potential modifying effects of As metabolism and cigarette smoking. A case-control study was conducted in areas of Hungary, Romania, and Slovakia. Cases were histologically confirmed cases of bladder cancer and controls were general surgery, orthopedic, and trauma patients. Exposure indices were constructed based on information on As intake over lifetime of participants. The study recruited 185 cases of histologically verified bladder cancer and 540 controls. The estimated effect of As on cancer was stronger in participants with urinary markers indicating inefficient metabolism of As. By smoking category moderate smokers showed lower As-related risks than either never smokers or heavy smokers. We found a positive association between urothelial cancer and exposure to iAs through drinking water at concentrations below 100 μg/L.

Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationArsenic Research and Global Sustainability - Proceedings of the 6th International Congress on Arsenic in the Environment, AS 2016
PublisherCRC Press/Balkema
Pages357-358
Number of pages2
ISBN (Print)9781138029415
Publication statusPublished - Jan 1 2016
Event6th International Congress on Arsenic in the Environment, AS 2016 - Stockholm, Sweden
Duration: Jun 19 2016Jun 23 2016

Other

Other6th International Congress on Arsenic in the Environment, AS 2016
CountrySweden
CityStockholm
Period6/19/166/23/16

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pollution
  • Environmental Chemistry

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  • Cite this

    ASHRAM Study Group (2016). Smoking and metabolism phenotype interact with inorganic arsenic in causing bladder cancer. In Arsenic Research and Global Sustainability - Proceedings of the 6th International Congress on Arsenic in the Environment, AS 2016 (pp. 357-358). CRC Press/Balkema.