A vékonybél kapszulás endoszkópos vizsgálata. A coeliakia diagnosztikája

Translated title of the contribution: Small intestine capsule endoscopy in the diagnostics of coeliac disease

Márta Kovács, Péter Pák, Gábor Pák, J. Fehér

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Coeliac disease is an autoimmun enterophathy precipitated by the gluten content of cereals. It had for long been considered a childhood condition as clinical symptoms manifested when gluten was introduced into the diet. The introduction of specific serological markers changed our understanding of the epidemiology and semiology of the syndrome. The main difficulty of the diagnostics arises from the fact that over 50% of patients with glutensensitive enteropathy show atypical symptoms, while coeliac-disease patients with extra-gastrointestinal manifestations show no gastrointestinal symptoms at all. Diagnostics of coeliac disease is currently based on the detection of specific antibodies and the histological assessment of the duodenum. Macroscopic signs of villous atrophy (reduction in the number or loss of Kerking's folds, vascular pattern visible through the mucosa, "mosaic or micronodular" pattern, "scalloped" folds) are clearly visible in untreated patients. Capsule endoscopy, contrary to conventional endoscopic approaches, enables non-invasive, pain-free investigation of the entire small intestine. Duodenal mucosa is visualised at an 8:1 magnification during the investigation, enabling the assessment of villous atrophy by an experienced investigator. Based on preliminary experience, standard upper tract endoscopy and capsule endoscopy appear to exhibit equal levels of sensitivity and specificity for coeliac disease. The advantage of CE versus upper tract endoscopy lies in the complete assessability of the small intestine, thus also enabling the assessment of the spread and severity of the disease. The disadvantage associated with the approach is the lack of histological biopsy samples. CE is recommendable as a first line approach for patients with proven coeliac disease when alarm conditions appear.

Original languageHungarian
Pages (from-to)1951-1955
Number of pages5
JournalOrvosi Hetilap
Volume149
Issue number41
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Oct 12 2008

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Capsule Endoscopy
Celiac Disease
Small Intestine
Glutens
Endoscopy
Atrophy
Mucous Membrane
Duodenum
Blood Vessels
Epidemiology
Research Personnel
Diet
Biopsy
Sensitivity and Specificity
Antibodies

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

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A vékonybél kapszulás endoszkópos vizsgálata. A coeliakia diagnosztikája. / Kovács, Márta; Pák, Péter; Pák, Gábor; Fehér, J.

In: Orvosi Hetilap, Vol. 149, No. 41, 12.10.2008, p. 1951-1955.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Kovács, Márta ; Pák, Péter ; Pák, Gábor ; Fehér, J. / A vékonybél kapszulás endoszkópos vizsgálata. A coeliakia diagnosztikája. In: Orvosi Hetilap. 2008 ; Vol. 149, No. 41. pp. 1951-1955.
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