Slope stability and rockfall assessment of volcanic tuffs using RPAS with 2-D FEM slope modelling

A. Török, Árpád Barsi, Gyula Bögöly, Tamás Lovas, Árpád Somogyi, Péter Görög

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

9 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Steep, hardly accessible cliffs of rhyolite tuff in NE Hungary are prone to rockfalls, endangering visitors of a castle. Remote sensing techniques were employed to obtain data on terrain morphology and to provide slope geometry for assessing the stability of these rock walls. A RPAS (Remotely Piloted Aircraft System) was used to collect images which were processed by Pix4D mapper (structure from motion technology) to generate a point cloud and mesh. The georeferencing was made by Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS) with the use of seven ground control points. The obtained digital surface model (DSM) was processed (vegetation removal) and the derived digital terrain model (DTM) allowed cross sections to be drawn and a joint system to be detected. Joint and discontinuity system was also verified by field measurements. On-site tests as well as laboratory tests provided additional engineering geological data for slope modelling. Stability of cliffs was assessed by 2-D FEM (finite element method). Global analyses of cross sections show that weak intercalating tuff layers may serve as potential slip surfaces. However, at present the greatest hazard is related to planar failure along ENE-WSW joints and to wedge failure. The paper demonstrates that RPAS is a rapid and useful tool for generating a reliable terrain model of hardly accessible cliff faces. It also emphasizes the efficiency of RPAS in rockfall hazard assessment in comparison with other remote sensing techniques such as terrestrial laser scanning (TLS).

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)583-597
Number of pages15
JournalNatural Hazards and Earth System Sciences
Volume18
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Feb 23 2018

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rockfall
slope stability
cliff
finite element method
aircraft
tuff
cross section
modeling
remote sensing
GNSS
ground control
digital terrain model
hazard assessment
wall rock
rhyolite
discontinuity
laser
hazard
geometry
engineering

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Earth and Planetary Sciences(all)

Cite this

Slope stability and rockfall assessment of volcanic tuffs using RPAS with 2-D FEM slope modelling. / Török, A.; Barsi, Árpád; Bögöly, Gyula; Lovas, Tamás; Somogyi, Árpád; Görög, Péter.

In: Natural Hazards and Earth System Sciences, Vol. 18, No. 2, 23.02.2018, p. 583-597.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Török, A. ; Barsi, Árpád ; Bögöly, Gyula ; Lovas, Tamás ; Somogyi, Árpád ; Görög, Péter. / Slope stability and rockfall assessment of volcanic tuffs using RPAS with 2-D FEM slope modelling. In: Natural Hazards and Earth System Sciences. 2018 ; Vol. 18, No. 2. pp. 583-597.
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