Sleep deprivation

Effects on work capacity, self-paced walking, contractile properties and perceived exertion

C. D. Rodgers, D. H. Paterson, D. A. Cunningham, E. G. Noble, F. P. Pettigrew, W. S. Myles, A. Taylor

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

46 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The primary purpose of this study was to examine the effect of a 48-hour period of sleep deprivation on the performance of selected physical work tasks [30-45% of maximum oxygen consumption (VO2max)]. In addition, this study assessed the effect of continual performance of physical work during sleep deprivation on standardized physiological and psychological test scores. Nineteen male subjects performed six different physical tasks, designed to involve all major muscle groups, during a 48-hour period of sleep deprivation. Fourteen subjects served as sleep-deprivation controls. Performance on all physical work tasks decreased significantly. Neither sleep deprivation (SD) or sleep deprivation in conjunction with continuous physical work (SDW) had any effect on muscle contractile properties, anaerobic power measures or resting blood glucose and lactate concentrations. Only SD subjects demonstrated a decline in cardiorespiratory function. Self-selected walking pace decreased and perceived exertion increased significantly in the SDW group. Positive and negative mood scores were adversely affected in both groups, the total change being greatest in SD subjects. The results indicate that performance of physical work tasks requiring 30-45% VO2max declines significantly over a 48-hour period of sleep deprivation. However, maximal physiological function is not unduly compromised by either the work tasks in conjunction with sleep deprivation or by sleep deprivation alone.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)30-38
Number of pages9
JournalSleep
Volume18
Issue number1
Publication statusPublished - 1995

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Sleep Deprivation
Walking
Psychological Tests
Muscles
Oxygen Consumption
Blood Glucose
Lactic Acid

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Physiology

Cite this

Rodgers, C. D., Paterson, D. H., Cunningham, D. A., Noble, E. G., Pettigrew, F. P., Myles, W. S., & Taylor, A. (1995). Sleep deprivation: Effects on work capacity, self-paced walking, contractile properties and perceived exertion. Sleep, 18(1), 30-38.

Sleep deprivation : Effects on work capacity, self-paced walking, contractile properties and perceived exertion. / Rodgers, C. D.; Paterson, D. H.; Cunningham, D. A.; Noble, E. G.; Pettigrew, F. P.; Myles, W. S.; Taylor, A.

In: Sleep, Vol. 18, No. 1, 1995, p. 30-38.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Rodgers, CD, Paterson, DH, Cunningham, DA, Noble, EG, Pettigrew, FP, Myles, WS & Taylor, A 1995, 'Sleep deprivation: Effects on work capacity, self-paced walking, contractile properties and perceived exertion', Sleep, vol. 18, no. 1, pp. 30-38.
Rodgers CD, Paterson DH, Cunningham DA, Noble EG, Pettigrew FP, Myles WS et al. Sleep deprivation: Effects on work capacity, self-paced walking, contractile properties and perceived exertion. Sleep. 1995;18(1):30-38.
Rodgers, C. D. ; Paterson, D. H. ; Cunningham, D. A. ; Noble, E. G. ; Pettigrew, F. P. ; Myles, W. S. ; Taylor, A. / Sleep deprivation : Effects on work capacity, self-paced walking, contractile properties and perceived exertion. In: Sleep. 1995 ; Vol. 18, No. 1. pp. 30-38.
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