Simulation and minimisation of the airway deposition of airborne bacteria

I. Balásházy, Alpr Horvth, Zoltn Srkny, Rpd Farkas, Werner Hofmann

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

7 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Respiratory infections represent one of the most important bioaerosol-associated health effects. Bacteria are infectious micro-organisms that may, after inhalation, cause specific respiratory diseases. Although a large number of inhalable pathogenic bacteria have been identified and the related respiratory symptoms are well known, their airway transport and deposition are still not fully explored. The objective of this work was to characterise the deposition of inhaled bacteria in different regions of the lung and to find the optimum breathing modes, which ensure the minimum chance of a bacterial infection in a given environment. For this purpose a stochastic computer lung model has been applied. In order to find the breathing pattern that yields the lowest deposited fraction of the inhaled particles, multiple simulations were carried out with several combinations of tidal volumes ranging from 400 to 2000ml, and breathing cycles ranging from 2 to 10s. Particle aerodynamic diameters varied between 1 and 20μm, and simulations were performed for both nose and mouth breathing conditions. Present computations demonstrated that regional (extrathoracic, tracheobronchial, acinar), lobar, and generation number-specific deposition distributions of the inhaled particles are highly sensitive to their aerodynamic diameter and to the breathing parameters. According to our results, mouth breathing with short breathing periods, no breath hold, and low tidal volumes minimises the total respiratory system deposition. On the other hand, lung (bronchial and acinar) deposition can be minimised by a breathing mode characterised by short breathing cycles through the nose with long breath holds after exhalations and high tidal volumes.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1021-1029
Number of pages9
JournalInhalation Toxicology
Volume21
Issue number12
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2009

Fingerprint

Bacteria
Respiration
Tidal Volume
Mouth Breathing
Aerodynamics
Nose
Respiratory system
Lung
Pulmonary diseases
Exhalation
Health
Bacterial Infections
Respiratory Tract Infections
Respiratory System
Computer Simulation
Inhalation

Keywords

  • Airway deposition
  • Bacterial infection
  • Stochastic lung model

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Toxicology
  • Health, Toxicology and Mutagenesis

Cite this

Simulation and minimisation of the airway deposition of airborne bacteria. / Balásházy, I.; Horvth, Alpr; Srkny, Zoltn; Farkas, Rpd; Hofmann, Werner.

In: Inhalation Toxicology, Vol. 21, No. 12, 2009, p. 1021-1029.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Balásházy, I. ; Horvth, Alpr ; Srkny, Zoltn ; Farkas, Rpd ; Hofmann, Werner. / Simulation and minimisation of the airway deposition of airborne bacteria. In: Inhalation Toxicology. 2009 ; Vol. 21, No. 12. pp. 1021-1029.
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