Short-term radiofrequency exposure from new generation mobile phones reduces EEG alpha power with no effects on cognitive performance

Zsuzsanna Vecsei, Balázs Knakker, Péter Juhász, György Thuróczy, Attila Trunk, I. Hernádi

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Although mobile phone (MP) use has been steadily increasing in the last decades and similar positive trends are expected for the near future, systematic investigations on neurophysiological and cognitive effects caused by recently developed technological standards for MPs are scarcely available. Here, we investigated the effects of radiofrequency (RF) fields emitted by new-generation mobile technologies, specifically, Universal Mobile Telecommunications System (UMTS) and Long-Term Evolution (LTE), on intrinsic scalp EEG activity in the alpha band (8–12 Hz) and cognitive performance in the Stroop test. The study involved 60 healthy, young-adult university students (34 for UMTS and 26 for LTE) with double-blind administration of Real and Sham exposure in separate sessions. EEG was recorded before, during and after RF exposure, and Stroop performance was assessed before and after EEG recording. Both RF exposure types caused a notable decrease in the alpha power over the whole scalp that persisted even after the cessation of the exposure, whereas no effects were found on any aspects of performance in the Stroop test. The results imply that the brain networks underlying global alpha oscillations might require minor reconfiguration to adapt to the local biophysical changes caused by focal RF exposure mimicking MP use.

Original languageEnglish
Article number18010
JournalScientific Reports
Volume8
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Dec 1 2018

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Cell Phones
Stroop Test
Telecommunications
Electroencephalography
Scalp
Young Adult
Students
Technology
Brain
Power (Psychology)

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • General

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Short-term radiofrequency exposure from new generation mobile phones reduces EEG alpha power with no effects on cognitive performance. / Vecsei, Zsuzsanna; Knakker, Balázs; Juhász, Péter; Thuróczy, György; Trunk, Attila; Hernádi, I.

In: Scientific Reports, Vol. 8, No. 1, 18010, 01.12.2018.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Vecsei, Zsuzsanna ; Knakker, Balázs ; Juhász, Péter ; Thuróczy, György ; Trunk, Attila ; Hernádi, I. / Short-term radiofrequency exposure from new generation mobile phones reduces EEG alpha power with no effects on cognitive performance. In: Scientific Reports. 2018 ; Vol. 8, No. 1.
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