Sentinel nodes, micrometastases and isolated tumor cells

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

4 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

If one delves in the fields of medical history, it may happen that who was the first to make a statement in some area is challenged by others. To my knowledge, micrometastases were originally named so by Huvos et al,1 because they had been supposed to be detectable only by microscopy instead of being picked up at gross examination. A noninclusive size limit of 2 mm was suggested by these authors, who found no survival disadvantage for breast cancer patients with only micrometastases as compared to those with no metastasis at all, after a minimum follow-up of 8 years. Although this study suffers from low patient numbers (only 18 patients with micrometastasis) and lack of detail on the pathologic assessment of the lymph nodes (probably meaning that a single hematoxylin and eosin (H&E)-stained slide was assessed for each), it can be credited for a definition of micrometastases. It also suggested that not only the number of metastatic nodes but also the tumor burden in the lymph nodes may be an important aspect of nodal involvement.

Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationPrognostic and Predictive Factors in Breast Cancer
PublisherCRC Press
Pages68-87
Number of pages20
ISBN (Electronic)9781439807231
ISBN (Print)0415422256, 9780415422253
Publication statusPublished - Jan 1 2008

Fingerprint

Neoplasm Micrometastasis
Neoplasms
Lymph Nodes
Hematoxylin
Eosine Yellowish-(YS)
Tumor Burden
Microscopy
Breast Neoplasms
Neoplasm Metastasis
Survival
cyhalothrin

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Cserni, G. (2008). Sentinel nodes, micrometastases and isolated tumor cells. In Prognostic and Predictive Factors in Breast Cancer (pp. 68-87). CRC Press.

Sentinel nodes, micrometastases and isolated tumor cells. / Cserni, G.

Prognostic and Predictive Factors in Breast Cancer. CRC Press, 2008. p. 68-87.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

Cserni, G 2008, Sentinel nodes, micrometastases and isolated tumor cells. in Prognostic and Predictive Factors in Breast Cancer. CRC Press, pp. 68-87.
Cserni G. Sentinel nodes, micrometastases and isolated tumor cells. In Prognostic and Predictive Factors in Breast Cancer. CRC Press. 2008. p. 68-87
Cserni, G. / Sentinel nodes, micrometastases and isolated tumor cells. Prognostic and Predictive Factors in Breast Cancer. CRC Press, 2008. pp. 68-87
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