Sensitization or tolerance to morphine effects after repeated stresses

G. Benedek, Margit Szikszay

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

21 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

1. 1. Rats were subjected to prolonged footshock, Intensive acoustic stress, cold water swim and restraint over a period of 10 days. The analgesic and thermoregulatory properties of morphine (2, 4 and 8 mg/kg, sc.) were tested on the 11th day. Analgesia assessment was performed by means of hot-plate (HP) and tail-flick (TF) tests, and body temperature (Tb) changes was measured. 2. 2. Prolonged footshock and acoustic stress increased the sensitivity to morphine, while repeated restraint lessened morphine's effect. Cold water swim caused ambiguous consequences, facilitated the effect of a small dose of morphine, but reduced that of a large dose. 3. 3. It was concluded that the sensory components of the stressful exposure determine the effects of repeated stress on morphine sensitivity. Whereas painful interventions led to sensitization, and non-painful procedures result in tolerance to morphine's effects. 4. 4. The finding that analgesic and thermoregulatory effects of morphine were simultaneously enhanced supports the contention that the mechanism of sensitization to opiates involves a site where pathways mediating opiate analgesia and thermoregulatory effects converge.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)369-380
Number of pages12
JournalProgress in Neuro-Psychopharmacology and Biological Psychiatry
Volume9
Issue number4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1985

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Morphine
Opiate Alkaloids
Acoustics
Analgesia
Analgesics
Body Temperature Changes
Dehydration
Tail
Water

Keywords

  • analgesia
  • morphine
  • opiates
  • stress-induced
  • thermoregulation

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biological Psychiatry
  • Pharmacology

Cite this

Sensitization or tolerance to morphine effects after repeated stresses. / Benedek, G.; Szikszay, Margit.

In: Progress in Neuro-Psychopharmacology and Biological Psychiatry, Vol. 9, No. 4, 1985, p. 369-380.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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