Sensitivity analysis of an ozone deposition model

R. Mészáros, I. Zsély, D. Szinyei, Cs Vincze, I. Lagzi

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

15 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

In this study, sophisticated sensitivity analyses of a detailed ozone dry deposition model were performed for five soil types (sand, sandy loam, loam, clay loam, clay) and four land use categories (agricultural land, grass, coniferous and deciduous forests). Deposition velocity and ozone flux depend on the weather situation, physiological state of the plants and numerous surface-, vegetation-, and soil-dependent parameters. The input data and the parameters of deposition-related calculations all have higher or lower spatial and temporal variability. We have investigated the effect of the variability of the meteorological data (cloudiness, relative humidity and air temperature), plant-dependent (leaf area index and maximum stomatal conductance) and soil-dependent (soil moisture) parameters on ozone deposition velocity. To evaluate this effect, two global methods, the Morris method and the Monte Carlo analysis with Latin hypercube sampling were applied. Additionally, local sensitivity analyses were performed to estimate the contribution of non-stomatal resistances to deposition velocity. Using the Monte Carlo simulations, the ensemble effect of several nonlinear processes can be recognised and described. Based on the results of the Morris method, the individual effects on deposition velocity are found to be significant in the case of soil moisture and maximum stomatal conductance. Temperature and leaf area index are also important factors; the former is primarily in the case of agricultural land, while the latter is for grass and coniferous forest. The results of local sensitivity analyses reveal the importance of non-stomatal resistances.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)663-672
Number of pages10
JournalAtmospheric Environment
Volume43
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jan 2009

Fingerprint

deposition velocity
Ozone
Sensitivity analysis
sensitivity analysis
ozone
stomatal conductance
coniferous forest
leaf area index
agricultural land
soil moisture
Soil moisture
grass
Soils
Monte Carlo analysis
clay loam
Clay
dry deposition
sandy loam
loam
deciduous forest

Keywords

  • Deposition model
  • Monte Carlo method
  • Morris method
  • Ozone fluxes
  • Sensitivity analyses

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Atmospheric Science
  • Environmental Science(all)

Cite this

Sensitivity analysis of an ozone deposition model. / Mészáros, R.; Zsély, I.; Szinyei, D.; Vincze, Cs; Lagzi, I.

In: Atmospheric Environment, Vol. 43, No. 3, 01.2009, p. 663-672.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Mészáros, R. ; Zsély, I. ; Szinyei, D. ; Vincze, Cs ; Lagzi, I. / Sensitivity analysis of an ozone deposition model. In: Atmospheric Environment. 2009 ; Vol. 43, No. 3. pp. 663-672.
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