Selfishness versus functional cooperation in a stochastic protocell model

Elias Zintzaras, Mauro Santos, E. Szathmáry

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

12 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

How to design an "evolvable" artificial system capable to increase in complexity? Although Darwin's theory of evolution by natural selection obviously offers a firm foundation, little hope of success seems to be expected from the explanatory adequacy of modern evolutionary theory, which does a good job at explaining what has already happened but remains practically helpless at predicting what will occur. However, the study of the major transitions in evolution clearly suggests that increases in complexity have occurred on those occasions when the conflicting interests between competing individuals were partly subjugated. This immediately raises the issue about "levels of selection" in evolutionary biology, and the idea that multi-level selection scenarios are required for complexity to emerge. After analyzing the dynamical behaviour of competing replicators within compartments, we show here that a proliferation of differentiated catalysts and/or improvement of catalytic efficiency of ribozymes can potentially evolve in properly designed artificial cells where the strong internal competition between the different species of replicators is somewhat prevented (i.e., by choosing them with equal probability). Experimental evolution in these systems will likely stand as beautiful examples of artificial adaptive systems, and will provide new insights to understand possible evolutionary paths to the evolution of metabolic complexity.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)605-613
Number of pages9
JournalJournal of Theoretical Biology
Volume267
Issue number4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Dec 21 2010

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Artificial Cells
Catalytic RNA
Genetic Selection
Adaptive systems
Stochastic models
Stochastic Model
Catalysts
Natural Selection
Adaptive Systems
Proliferation
Catalyst
catalytic activity
catalysts
Dynamical Behavior
natural selection
Biology
Immediately
Likely
Internal
Biological Sciences

Keywords

  • Artificial cells
  • Functional complexity
  • Monte Carlo methods
  • QΒ replicase
  • Ribozymes

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)
  • Immunology and Microbiology(all)
  • Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology(all)
  • Agricultural and Biological Sciences(all)
  • Modelling and Simulation
  • Statistics and Probability
  • Applied Mathematics

Cite this

Selfishness versus functional cooperation in a stochastic protocell model. / Zintzaras, Elias; Santos, Mauro; Szathmáry, E.

In: Journal of Theoretical Biology, Vol. 267, No. 4, 21.12.2010, p. 605-613.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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