Selective responses of class III plant peroxidase isoforms to environmentally relevant UV-B doses

Arnold Rácz, É. Hideg, Gyula Czégény

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Efficient hydrogen peroxide detoxification is an essential aspect of plant defence against a large variety of stressors. Among others, class III peroxidase (POD, EC 1.11.1.7) enzymes provide this function. Previous studies have shown that PODs are present in several isoforms and have in general low substrate specificities. The aim of our work was to study how various assays based on using various substrates reflect differences in peroxidase activities of tobacco leaves due to either developmental or environmental factors. The former factor was studied comparing fully developed leaves of the 3rd and 5th nodes; and the latter was achieved using plants acclimated to low doses of supplementary UV-B (280–315 nm) in growth chambers. To investigate the above, POD activities were measured using three different, commonly used chromophore substrates: ABTS (2,2′-azino-bis(3-ethylbenzothiazoline-6-sulphonic acid)), guaiacol (2-methoxyphenol), OPD (o-phenylenediamine) and a fourth substrate, the secondary metabolite quercetin. All substrates registered a UV-B induced increase in leaf peroxidases as compared to untreated controls, although to different extents. However, age-related differences between upper and lower leaves were only detectable when either ABTS or quercetin were used as substrates. Additionally, native PAGE separation of POD isoforms followed by visualisation using one of the substrates showed that leaf acclimation to supplementary UV-B is realized via a selective activation of POD isoforms.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)101-106
Number of pages6
JournalJournal of Plant Physiology
Volume221
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Feb 1 2018

Fingerprint

Peroxidase
Guaiacol
Protein Isoforms
peroxidase
Quercetin
dosage
Native Polyacrylamide Gel Electrophoresis
Peroxidases
leaves
Sulfonic Acids
Acclimatization
quercetin
Substrate Specificity
Hydrogen Peroxide
Tobacco
guaiacol
peroxidases
sulfonic acid
substrate specificity
growth chambers

Keywords

  • Leaf
  • Peroxidase
  • Substrate dependence
  • Tobacco
  • Ultraviolet light

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Physiology
  • Agronomy and Crop Science
  • Plant Science

Cite this

Selective responses of class III plant peroxidase isoforms to environmentally relevant UV-B doses. / Rácz, Arnold; Hideg, É.; Czégény, Gyula.

In: Journal of Plant Physiology, Vol. 221, 01.02.2018, p. 101-106.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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