Seeing the face through the eyes

a developmental perspective on face expertise

Teodora Gliga, G. Csibra

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

59 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Most people are experts in face recognition. We propose that the special status of this particular body part in telling individuals apart is the result of a developmental process that heavily biases human infants and children to attend towards the eyes of others. We review the evidence supporting this proposal, including neuroimaging results and studies in developmental disorders, like autism. We propose that the most likely explanation of infants' bias towards eyes is the fact that eye gaze serves important communicative functions in humans.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)323-339
Number of pages17
JournalProgress in Brain Research
Volume164
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2007

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Autistic Disorder
Human Body
Neuroimaging
Facial Recognition

Keywords

  • amygdala
  • development
  • expertise
  • face recognition
  • gaze perception
  • infancy

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Neuroscience(all)

Cite this

Seeing the face through the eyes : a developmental perspective on face expertise. / Gliga, Teodora; Csibra, G.

In: Progress in Brain Research, Vol. 164, 2007, p. 323-339.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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