Second-order magnetic phase transition in the Earth

J. Kiss, L. Szarka, E. Prácser

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

19 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

It is known that second-order magnetic phase transition, the transition between ferromagnetic (ferrimagnetic) and paramagnetic states of the material at the Curie temperature, is accompanied by a sharp (theoretically infinite) enhancement of the magnetic susceptibility. A second-order magnetic phase transition within the Earth (usually at mid-crustal depths, depending on geothermal conditions and on the type of magnetic material) is assumed to produce extremely high susceptibility zones of a thickness of a few hundreds of meters. Such strongly magnetized zones may be sources of well-known but not-yet explained geomagnetic anomalies, and at the same time, they may produce complicated electrical conductivity anomalies, as well. The second-order magnetic phase transition should be taken into account as one of the possible sources of geomagnetic and magnetotelluric anomalies.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1-4
Number of pages4
JournalGeophysical Research Letters
Volume32
Issue number24
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Dec 28 2005

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phase transition
anomaly
magnetic anomalies
anomalies
magnetic susceptibility
magnetic permeability
electrical conductivity
magnetic materials
Curie temperature
electrical resistivity
augmentation
temperature
material

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Earth and Planetary Sciences (miscellaneous)

Cite this

Second-order magnetic phase transition in the Earth. / Kiss, J.; Szarka, L.; Prácser, E.

In: Geophysical Research Letters, Vol. 32, No. 24, 28.12.2005, p. 1-4.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Kiss, J. ; Szarka, L. ; Prácser, E. / Second-order magnetic phase transition in the Earth. In: Geophysical Research Letters. 2005 ; Vol. 32, No. 24. pp. 1-4.
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