Seasonal changes of proapoptotic soluble Fas ligand level in allergic rhinitis combined with asthma

Györgyi Mezei, Magdolna Lévay, Zsuzsanna Sepler, Erika Héninger, G. Kozma, Endre Cserháti

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

5 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The function of apoptosis is to eliminate unnecessary or dangerous cells. The balance between production and death is important in the control of cell numbers within physiological ranges. Cells involved in allergic reactions may have altered apoptosis. The aim of this study was to examine the seasonal changes of programmed cell death in children with pollen allergy. We measured serum levels of soluble Fas (sFas) and soluble Fas ligand (sFasL), and examined whether there was any correlation between soluble apoptosis markers and development of asthma and or rhinitis in children with pollen allergy. We examined two groups of patients with ragweed pollen allergy. The first group consisted of 17 children with 'rhinitis only'. The second group consisted of 16 children with 'asthma + rhinitis'. For seasonal analysis we pooled the two groups and termed this the 'ragweed sensitive' group (n = 33, 5-18 yr, 25 boys, eight girls). Measurements (sFas and sFasL) were taken during the ragweed pollen allergy season, while control measurements were performed during the symptom-free period. There was no difference in sFas levels measured during and after [1941 ± 68, 1963 ± 83 pg/ml (mean±s.e.m, respectively)] the pollen season in the 'ragweed sensitive' group. The sFasL level showed seasonal change, which was significantly higher (p = 0.0086) in the symptomatic period compared to the symptom-free state (99 ± 13 and 53 ± 16 pg/ml, respectively). There was a difference between the 'rhinitis only' and the 'asthma + rhinitis' groups in the measured parameters of apoptosis. Children having allergic rhinitis combined with asthma had a significantly (p = 0.03) higher sFas level in the symptom-free state than the 'rhinitis only' group did (2115 ± 156 and 1820 ± 52 pg/ml, respectively). During the allergic symptom state the sFasL level of the 'asthma + rhinitis' group was significantly higher (p = 0.025) than that of the 'rhinitis only' group (125 ± 20 and 75 ± 14 pg/ml, respectively). In conclusion, the increased level of sFasL during the pollen season may signal its role in the pathogenesis of allergic airway diseases. There was no seasonal change in sFas levels in the examined ragweed allergic group, however in the symptomatic period we observed a diminished level of antiapoptotic factor (sFas) and an elevated level of proapoptotic factor (sFasL) if there was a combined disease with pollen allergic asthma. We suggest that there is a deviation in the apoptotic reaction in children that may increase the seasonal allergic inflammation.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)444-449
Number of pages6
JournalPediatric Allergy and Immunology
Volume17
Issue number6
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Sep 2006

Fingerprint

Fas Ligand Protein
Rhinitis
Asthma
Seasonal Allergic Rhinitis
Ambrosia
Pollen
Apoptosis
Allergic Rhinitis
Hypersensitivity
Cell Death
Cell Count
Inflammation
Serum

Keywords

  • Allergic rhinitis with or without asthma
  • Apoptosis
  • Children
  • Soluble Fas
  • Soluble Fas ligand

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Immunology and Allergy
  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health
  • Immunology

Cite this

Seasonal changes of proapoptotic soluble Fas ligand level in allergic rhinitis combined with asthma. / Mezei, Györgyi; Lévay, Magdolna; Sepler, Zsuzsanna; Héninger, Erika; Kozma, G.; Cserháti, Endre.

In: Pediatric Allergy and Immunology, Vol. 17, No. 6, 09.2006, p. 444-449.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Mezei, Györgyi ; Lévay, Magdolna ; Sepler, Zsuzsanna ; Héninger, Erika ; Kozma, G. ; Cserháti, Endre. / Seasonal changes of proapoptotic soluble Fas ligand level in allergic rhinitis combined with asthma. In: Pediatric Allergy and Immunology. 2006 ; Vol. 17, No. 6. pp. 444-449.
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