Scv02as an alternative transfusion trigger

Szilvia Kocsi, Krisztián Tánczos, Z. Molnár

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

Abstract

Blood transfusion is often a life-saving but risky intervention. Restrictive transfusion protocols have recently been developed with a post-transfusion target haemoglobin level of 7-10 g/dL. Whether only haemoglobin level is enough to guide our transfusion practice is questionable; hence, the same level of anaemia may be harmless in sedated, haemodynamically stable patients, while it requires urgent treatment in unstable patients or when oxygen demand is increased. Therefore, it is not the haemoglobin level per se that determines the severity of anaemia but the imbalance between oxygen delivery and consumption. One of the simple surrogates to estimate the balance of the oxygen extrac-tion ratio is central venous oxygen saturation. In this chapter, the role of central venous oxygen saturation as an alternative transfusion trigger in addition to haemoglobin will be discussed.

Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationTransfusion in the Intensive Care Unit
PublisherSpringer International Publishing
Pages71-75
Number of pages5
ISBN (Print)9783319087351, 9783319087344
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jan 1 2015

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Hemoglobins
Oxygen
Anemia
Oxygen Consumption
Blood Transfusion
Therapeutics

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Kocsi, S., Tánczos, K., & Molnár, Z. (2015). Scv02as an alternative transfusion trigger. In Transfusion in the Intensive Care Unit (pp. 71-75). Springer International Publishing. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-08735-1_8

Scv02as an alternative transfusion trigger. / Kocsi, Szilvia; Tánczos, Krisztián; Molnár, Z.

Transfusion in the Intensive Care Unit. Springer International Publishing, 2015. p. 71-75.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

Kocsi, S, Tánczos, K & Molnár, Z 2015, Scv02as an alternative transfusion trigger. in Transfusion in the Intensive Care Unit. Springer International Publishing, pp. 71-75. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-08735-1_8
Kocsi S, Tánczos K, Molnár Z. Scv02as an alternative transfusion trigger. In Transfusion in the Intensive Care Unit. Springer International Publishing. 2015. p. 71-75 https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-08735-1_8
Kocsi, Szilvia ; Tánczos, Krisztián ; Molnár, Z. / Scv02as an alternative transfusion trigger. Transfusion in the Intensive Care Unit. Springer International Publishing, 2015. pp. 71-75
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