Scaling properties of pyramidal neurons in mice neocortex

Andreas Schierwagen, A. Alpár, Ulrich Gärtner

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

4 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Dendritic morphology is the structural correlate for receiving and processing inputs to a neuron. An interesting question then is what the design principles and the functional consequences of enlarged or shrinked dendritic trees might be. As yet, only a few studies have examined the effects of neuron size changes. Two theoretical scaling modes have been analyzed, conservative (isoelectrotonic) scaling (preserves the passive and active response properties) and isometric scaling (steps up low pass-filtering of inputs). It has been suggested that both scaling modes were verified in neuroanatomical studies. To overcome obvious limitations of these studies like small size of analyzed samples and restricted validity of utilized scaling measures, we considered the scaling problem of neurons on the basis of large sample data and by employing a more general method of scaling analysis. This method consists in computing the morphoelectrotonic transform (MET) of neurons. The MET maps the neuron from anatomical space into electrotonic space using the logarithm of voltage attenuation as the distance metric. The theory underlying this approach is described and then applied to two samples of morphologically reconstructed pyramidal neurons (cells from neocortex of wildtype and synRas transgenic mice) using the NEURON simulator. In a previous study, we could verify a striking increase of dendritic tree size in synRas pyramidal neurons. Surprisingly, in this study the statistical analysis of the sample MET dendrograms revealed that the electrotonic architecture of these neurons scaled roughly in a MET-conserving mode. In conclusion, our results suggest only a minor impact of the Ras protein on dendritic electroanatomy, with non-significant changes of most regions of the corresponding METs.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)352-364
Number of pages13
JournalMathematical Biosciences
Volume207
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jun 2007

Fingerprint

neocortex
Pyramidal Cells
Neocortex
Neurons
Mouse
Neuron
transform
neurons
Scaling
mice
Transform
simulator
ras Proteins
statistical analysis
Transgenic Mice
Dendrogram
sampling
Sample Size
protein
Distance Metric

Keywords

  • Dendritic morphology
  • Dendrogram
  • Morphoelectrotonic transform
  • Pyramidal neurons
  • Scaling

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Agricultural and Biological Sciences(all)
  • Ecology, Evolution, Behavior and Systematics

Cite this

Scaling properties of pyramidal neurons in mice neocortex. / Schierwagen, Andreas; Alpár, A.; Gärtner, Ulrich.

In: Mathematical Biosciences, Vol. 207, No. 2, 06.2007, p. 352-364.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Schierwagen, Andreas ; Alpár, A. ; Gärtner, Ulrich. / Scaling properties of pyramidal neurons in mice neocortex. In: Mathematical Biosciences. 2007 ; Vol. 207, No. 2. pp. 352-364.
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