Round table on control of Aujeszky's disease and vaccine development based on molecular biology

M. Pensaert, A. L J Gielkens, B. Lomniczi, T. G. Kimman, P. Vannier, M. Eloit

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

14 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

A summary is given on the 4 topics which were discussed during the round table and which represent current knowledge on the molecular biology of Aujeszky's disease (pseudorabies) virus. They include a review on 1. the genome and gene products of the virus; 2. the viral genes associated with virulence; 3. the immunological role of the viral gene products and 4. studies intended to compare the efficacy of several commercially available vaccines and to establish a possible correlation between antibodies against individual structural viral proteins and degree of protection. It was concluded that gI deleted vaccines appear to be the best choice for use in intensive vaccination programmes towards eradication of Aujeszky's disease virus. However, there remains a need for development of more potent vaccines which induce strong humoral and cell mediated immune responses and afford complete protection, virological protection included. It is often observed that live vaccine strains which are completely avirulent lose much capacity to replicate and spread within the vaccinated animal. It is, however, not excluded that a certain degree of dissemination may be needed to be fully efficacious. Loss of virulence may thus be accompanied by too much loss of immunogenicity. An improved genetic stability of live vaccine strains when they are obtained by genetic manipulation, possibly justifies a more widespread dissemination of the vaccine strain in the body compared to that with conventionally developed strains or compared to what is presently allowed.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)53-67
Number of pages15
JournalVeterinary Microbiology
Volume33
Issue number1-4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1992

Fingerprint

Pseudorabies
Aujeszky disease
vaccine development
molecular biology
Molecular Biology
Suid Herpesvirus 1
Vaccines
vaccines
Suid herpesvirus 1
live vaccines
virulence
Virulence
genetic stability
genes
Vaccine Potency
viral proteins
structural proteins
Viral Structural Proteins
genetic engineering
cell-mediated immunity

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Animal Science and Zoology
  • Microbiology
  • veterinary(all)

Cite this

Round table on control of Aujeszky's disease and vaccine development based on molecular biology. / Pensaert, M.; Gielkens, A. L J; Lomniczi, B.; Kimman, T. G.; Vannier, P.; Eloit, M.

In: Veterinary Microbiology, Vol. 33, No. 1-4, 1992, p. 53-67.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Pensaert, M. ; Gielkens, A. L J ; Lomniczi, B. ; Kimman, T. G. ; Vannier, P. ; Eloit, M. / Round table on control of Aujeszky's disease and vaccine development based on molecular biology. In: Veterinary Microbiology. 1992 ; Vol. 33, No. 1-4. pp. 53-67.
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