Role of right hemifield in visual control of approach to target in zebrafish

A. Miklósi, Richard John Andrew, Sara Gasparini

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

28 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

When a zebrafish has to choose between two identical stimuli (e.g. a conditioned stimulus, CS, for food reward), it tends to respond to the one on its right. Errors are more numerous when reinforced for taking the one on the left rather than the one on the right. When trained to a single medial stimulus, and presented in non-reinforced probe trials with a pair of identical stimuli, the one on the right is chosen. Use by zebrafish of right eye (RE), viewing to control a planned motor response, extends from objects that are to be bitten to a choice of one of two routes. When the CS is visible behind a barrier of vertical bars, so that it can be approached around either end, it is the right end that is chosen. Standing motor bias independent of the nature of the task can be excluded. Other vertebrates show RE control of response. Toads are more likely to take food seen with the RE. The domestic chick uses the RE in visual control of approach to an object that has to be manipulated with the bill. RE control of use of the mouth in a fish shows that that this is an earlier condition than lateralised control of bilateral effectors like hands.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)57-65
Number of pages9
JournalBehavioural Brain Research
Volume122
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2001

Fingerprint

Zebrafish
Food
Reward
Anura
Mouth
Vertebrates
Fishes
Hand

Keywords

  • Lateralisation of viewing
  • Motor control
  • Zebrafish

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Behavioral Neuroscience

Cite this

Role of right hemifield in visual control of approach to target in zebrafish. / Miklósi, A.; Andrew, Richard John; Gasparini, Sara.

In: Behavioural Brain Research, Vol. 122, No. 1, 2001, p. 57-65.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Miklósi, A. ; Andrew, Richard John ; Gasparini, Sara. / Role of right hemifield in visual control of approach to target in zebrafish. In: Behavioural Brain Research. 2001 ; Vol. 122, No. 1. pp. 57-65.
@article{c76798b813054aac93c48e1a827e7513,
title = "Role of right hemifield in visual control of approach to target in zebrafish",
abstract = "When a zebrafish has to choose between two identical stimuli (e.g. a conditioned stimulus, CS, for food reward), it tends to respond to the one on its right. Errors are more numerous when reinforced for taking the one on the left rather than the one on the right. When trained to a single medial stimulus, and presented in non-reinforced probe trials with a pair of identical stimuli, the one on the right is chosen. Use by zebrafish of right eye (RE), viewing to control a planned motor response, extends from objects that are to be bitten to a choice of one of two routes. When the CS is visible behind a barrier of vertical bars, so that it can be approached around either end, it is the right end that is chosen. Standing motor bias independent of the nature of the task can be excluded. Other vertebrates show RE control of response. Toads are more likely to take food seen with the RE. The domestic chick uses the RE in visual control of approach to an object that has to be manipulated with the bill. RE control of use of the mouth in a fish shows that that this is an earlier condition than lateralised control of bilateral effectors like hands.",
keywords = "Lateralisation of viewing, Motor control, Zebrafish",
author = "A. Mikl{\'o}si and Andrew, {Richard John} and Sara Gasparini",
year = "2001",
doi = "10.1016/S0166-4328(01)00167-X",
language = "English",
volume = "122",
pages = "57--65",
journal = "Behavioural Brain Research",
issn = "0166-4328",
publisher = "Elsevier",
number = "1",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Role of right hemifield in visual control of approach to target in zebrafish

AU - Miklósi, A.

AU - Andrew, Richard John

AU - Gasparini, Sara

PY - 2001

Y1 - 2001

N2 - When a zebrafish has to choose between two identical stimuli (e.g. a conditioned stimulus, CS, for food reward), it tends to respond to the one on its right. Errors are more numerous when reinforced for taking the one on the left rather than the one on the right. When trained to a single medial stimulus, and presented in non-reinforced probe trials with a pair of identical stimuli, the one on the right is chosen. Use by zebrafish of right eye (RE), viewing to control a planned motor response, extends from objects that are to be bitten to a choice of one of two routes. When the CS is visible behind a barrier of vertical bars, so that it can be approached around either end, it is the right end that is chosen. Standing motor bias independent of the nature of the task can be excluded. Other vertebrates show RE control of response. Toads are more likely to take food seen with the RE. The domestic chick uses the RE in visual control of approach to an object that has to be manipulated with the bill. RE control of use of the mouth in a fish shows that that this is an earlier condition than lateralised control of bilateral effectors like hands.

AB - When a zebrafish has to choose between two identical stimuli (e.g. a conditioned stimulus, CS, for food reward), it tends to respond to the one on its right. Errors are more numerous when reinforced for taking the one on the left rather than the one on the right. When trained to a single medial stimulus, and presented in non-reinforced probe trials with a pair of identical stimuli, the one on the right is chosen. Use by zebrafish of right eye (RE), viewing to control a planned motor response, extends from objects that are to be bitten to a choice of one of two routes. When the CS is visible behind a barrier of vertical bars, so that it can be approached around either end, it is the right end that is chosen. Standing motor bias independent of the nature of the task can be excluded. Other vertebrates show RE control of response. Toads are more likely to take food seen with the RE. The domestic chick uses the RE in visual control of approach to an object that has to be manipulated with the bill. RE control of use of the mouth in a fish shows that that this is an earlier condition than lateralised control of bilateral effectors like hands.

KW - Lateralisation of viewing

KW - Motor control

KW - Zebrafish

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=0035081003&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=0035081003&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1016/S0166-4328(01)00167-X

DO - 10.1016/S0166-4328(01)00167-X

M3 - Article

VL - 122

SP - 57

EP - 65

JO - Behavioural Brain Research

JF - Behavioural Brain Research

SN - 0166-4328

IS - 1

ER -