Role of hypothalamic interleukin-6 and tumor necrosis factor-α in LPS fever in rat

J. J. Klir, J. Roth, Z. Szelényi, J. L. McClellan, M. J. Kluger

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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Abstract

The purpose of this study was to determine, using push-pull perfusion, the levels of interleukin (IL)-1-like, IL-6-like, and tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF)-like activity in the anterior hypothalamus during lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced fever in rats. Additionally, slow anterior hypothalamic infusions of human recombinant IL-6 (hrIL-6) or TNF (hrTNF) for several hours were performed to determine possible febrile effects of these two cytokines. Artificial cerebrospinal fluid (aCSF) was infused as a control. Samples of cerebrospinal fluid were collected 60 min before and 60, 180, 300, and 420 min after the intraperitoneal injection of LPS. A control group was injected intraperitoneally with saline. The core temperature (measured by biotelemetry) of LPS-injected rats was significantly higher (P <0.05) than the temperature of the rats injected with saline at 180, 300, and 420 min after the injection. The average postinjection IL-6 levels were significantly higher (P <0.05) in the LPS-injected group. TNF was significantly higher (P <0.05) than the baseline only at 180 min. There were no changes in levels of IL-1-like activity. Infusion of hrIL-6 at a level similar to the peak IL-6 level measured during LPS-induced fever resulted in a slowly developing and long-lasting increase in core temperature. Infusion of hrTNF at a level corresponding to the peak TNF level measured during LPS-induced fever did not induce a significant increase in core temperature. These results support the hypothesis that elevated hypothalamic concentrations of IL-6 are involved in the induction of fever elicited by peripheral (intraperitoneal) injection of LPS.

Original languageEnglish
JournalAmerican Journal of Physiology - Regulatory Integrative and Comparative Physiology
Volume265
Issue number3 34-3
Publication statusPublished - 1993

Fingerprint

Lipopolysaccharides
Interleukin-6
Fever
Tumor Necrosis Factor-alpha
Temperature
Intraperitoneal Injections
Interleukin-1
Cerebrospinal Fluid
Anterior Hypothalamus
Perfusion
Cytokines
Control Groups
Injections

Keywords

  • cytokines
  • interleukin-1
  • push-pull perfusion
  • temperature regulation

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Physiology

Cite this

Role of hypothalamic interleukin-6 and tumor necrosis factor-α in LPS fever in rat. / Klir, J. J.; Roth, J.; Szelényi, Z.; McClellan, J. L.; Kluger, M. J.

In: American Journal of Physiology - Regulatory Integrative and Comparative Physiology, Vol. 265, No. 3 34-3, 1993.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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