Role of endogenous CRF in the mediation of neuroendocrine and behavioral responses to calcitonin gene-related peptide in rats

Annamária Kovács, Éva Biró, Imola Szeleczky, G. Telegdy

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

22 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

It is well known that hormones can regulate behaviors. However, the reciprocal interaction, the effects of behavior on hormones, has received less direct experimental attention. Dramatic changes in hormones and behaviors occur at puberty and some of these changes can be triggered by modification of the social environment. Interactions with males accelerate production of pulsatile release of gonadotropins and steroid hormones which, in turn, initiate estrous cycles, ovulation, and sexual behavior in females. Ultimately all of these actions are controlled by changes in production and secretion of gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH). Little is known about how behavior affects GnRH-producing neurons. In female musk shrews, the first mating initiates the onset of puberty. Musk shrews lack a behavioral estrous cycle and they become receptive within minutes after their first contact with a male. As soon as 1 h after interactions with males there is a significant increase in the numbers of GnRH-immunoreactive (GnRH-ir) neurons in specific brain regions. In the present study, we examined changes in GnRH-ir cell number during the initial mating bout. We found dynamic changes in the numbers of GnRH-containing cells, correlated with changes in behavior. Interactions with males for less than 30 minutes induced a significant increase in GnRH-ir neurons in specific olfactory-related forebrain nuclei. At the end of a mating bout, numbers of GnRH-ir neurons declined. Because behavioral interactions have rapid and pronounced effects on the neurons that produce GnRH, this model can be used to examine the behavioral regulation of neuronal plasticity.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)418-424
Number of pages7
JournalNeuroendocrinology
Volume62
Issue number4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1995

Fingerprint

Calcitonin Gene-Related Peptide
Gonadotropin-Releasing Hormone
Neurons
Hormones
Shrews
Estrous Cycle
Puberty
Neuronal Plasticity
Social Environment
Prosencephalon
Ovulation
Gonadotropins
Sexual Behavior
Cell Count
Steroids
Brain

Keywords

  • Adrenal steroids
  • Calcitonin gene-related peptide
  • Corticotropin-releasing hormone
  • Grooming
  • Locomotor behavior

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Endocrinology
  • Endocrinology, Diabetes and Metabolism
  • Cellular and Molecular Neuroscience
  • Endocrine and Autonomic Systems
  • Neuroscience(all)

Cite this

Role of endogenous CRF in the mediation of neuroendocrine and behavioral responses to calcitonin gene-related peptide in rats. / Kovács, Annamária; Biró, Éva; Szeleczky, Imola; Telegdy, G.

In: Neuroendocrinology, Vol. 62, No. 4, 1995, p. 418-424.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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