Risk score for predicting death, myocardial infarction, and stroke in patients with stable angina, based on a large randomised trial cohort of patients

Tim C. Clayton, Jacobus Lubsen, Stuart J. Pocock, Zoltán Vokó, Bridget Anne Kirwan, Keith A.A. Fox, Philip A. Poole-Wilson

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

98 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective: To derive a risk score for the combination of death from all causes, myocardial infarction, and disabling stroke in patients with stable symptomatic angina who require treatment for angina and have preserved left ventricular function. Design: Multivariate Cox regression analysis of data from a large multicentre trial. Setting: Outpatient cardiology clinics in western Europe, Israel, Canada, Australia, and New Zealand. Participants: 7311 patients with all required data available. Main outcome measure: Death from any cause or myocardial infarction or disabling stroke during a mean follow-up of 4.9 years. Results: 1063 patients either died from any cause or sustained myocardial infarction or disabling stroke. The five year risk of this composite ranged from 4% for patients in the lowest tenth of risk to 35% for patients in the highest tenth. The risk score combines 16 routinely available clinical variables (in order of decreasing contribution): age, left ventricular ejection fraction, smoking, white blood cell count, diabetes, casual blood glucose concentration, creatinine concentration, previous stroke, at least one angina attack a week, coronary angiographic findings (if available), lipid lowering treatment, QT interval, systolic blood pressure ≥ 155 mm Hg, number of drugs used for angina, previous myocardial infarction, and sex. Fitting the same model separately to all cause death, myocardial infarction, and stroke gave similar results. The risk score did not seem to predict the nature of the event (death in 39%, myocardial infarction in 46%, and disabling stroke in 15%) or the incidence of angiography or revascularisation, which occurred in 29% of patients. Conclusion: This risk score is an objective aid in deciding on further management of patients with stable angina with the aim of reducing serious outcome events. The score can also be used in planning future trials.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)869-872
Number of pages4
JournalBritish medical journal
Volume331
Issue number7521
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Oct 15 2005

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

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