Rhythms of ghrelin, leptin, and sleep in rats: Effects of the normal diurnal cycle, restricted feeding, and sleep deprivation

B. Bodosi, J. Gardi, I. Hajdu, E. Szentirmai, F. Obal, J. M. Krueger

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

209 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

To determine the relationships among plasma ghrelin and leptin concentrations and hypothalamic ghrelin contents, and sleep, cortical brain temperature (Tcrt), and feeding, we determined these parameters in rats in three experimental conditions: in free-feeding rats with normal diurnal rhythms, in rats with feeding restricted to the 12-h light period (RF), and in rats subjected to 5-h of sleep deprivation (SD) at the beginning of the light cycle. Plasma ghrelin and leptin displayed diurnal rhythms with the ghrelin peak preceding and the leptin peak following the major daily feeding peak in hour 1 after dark onset. RF reversed the diurnal rhythm of these hormones and the rhythm of rapid-eye-movement sleep (REMS) and significantly altered the rhythm of Tcrt. In contrast, the duration and intensity of non-REMS (NREMS) were hardly responsive to RF. SD failed to change leptin concentrations, but it promptly stimulated plasma ghrelin and induced eating. SD elicited biphasic variations in the hypothalamic ghrelin contents. SD increased plasma corticosterone, but corticosterone did not seem to influence either leptin or ghrelin. The results suggest a strong relationship between feeding and the diurnal rhythm of leptin and that feeding also fundamentally modulates the diurnal rhythm of ghrelin. The variations in hypothalamic ghrelin contents might be associated with sleep-wake activity in rats, but, unlike the previous observations in humans, obvious links could not be detected between sleep and the diurnal rhythms of plasma concentrations of either ghrelin or leptin in the rat.

Original languageEnglish
JournalAmerican Journal of Physiology - Regulatory Integrative and Comparative Physiology
Volume287
Issue number5 56-5
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Nov 2004

Fingerprint

Ghrelin
Sleep Deprivation
Leptin
Sleep
Circadian Rhythm
Corticosterone
REM Sleep
Photoperiod
Eye Movements
Eating
Hormones
Light

Keywords

  • Brain temperature
  • Corticosterone
  • Electroen-cephalogram delta power
  • Hypothalamic ghrelin
  • Sleep duration

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Physiology

Cite this

Rhythms of ghrelin, leptin, and sleep in rats : Effects of the normal diurnal cycle, restricted feeding, and sleep deprivation. / Bodosi, B.; Gardi, J.; Hajdu, I.; Szentirmai, E.; Obal, F.; Krueger, J. M.

In: American Journal of Physiology - Regulatory Integrative and Comparative Physiology, Vol. 287, No. 5 56-5, 11.2004.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

@article{e8f3718a9fd8427b8f734ebc7904687a,
title = "Rhythms of ghrelin, leptin, and sleep in rats: Effects of the normal diurnal cycle, restricted feeding, and sleep deprivation",
abstract = "To determine the relationships among plasma ghrelin and leptin concentrations and hypothalamic ghrelin contents, and sleep, cortical brain temperature (Tcrt), and feeding, we determined these parameters in rats in three experimental conditions: in free-feeding rats with normal diurnal rhythms, in rats with feeding restricted to the 12-h light period (RF), and in rats subjected to 5-h of sleep deprivation (SD) at the beginning of the light cycle. Plasma ghrelin and leptin displayed diurnal rhythms with the ghrelin peak preceding and the leptin peak following the major daily feeding peak in hour 1 after dark onset. RF reversed the diurnal rhythm of these hormones and the rhythm of rapid-eye-movement sleep (REMS) and significantly altered the rhythm of Tcrt. In contrast, the duration and intensity of non-REMS (NREMS) were hardly responsive to RF. SD failed to change leptin concentrations, but it promptly stimulated plasma ghrelin and induced eating. SD elicited biphasic variations in the hypothalamic ghrelin contents. SD increased plasma corticosterone, but corticosterone did not seem to influence either leptin or ghrelin. The results suggest a strong relationship between feeding and the diurnal rhythm of leptin and that feeding also fundamentally modulates the diurnal rhythm of ghrelin. The variations in hypothalamic ghrelin contents might be associated with sleep-wake activity in rats, but, unlike the previous observations in humans, obvious links could not be detected between sleep and the diurnal rhythms of plasma concentrations of either ghrelin or leptin in the rat.",
keywords = "Brain temperature, Corticosterone, Electroen-cephalogram delta power, Hypothalamic ghrelin, Sleep duration",
author = "B. Bodosi and J. Gardi and I. Hajdu and E. Szentirmai and F. Obal and Krueger, {J. M.}",
year = "2004",
month = "11",
doi = "10.1152/ajpregu.00294.2004",
language = "English",
volume = "287",
journal = "American Journal of Physiology",
issn = "0363-6119",
publisher = "American Physiological Society",
number = "5 56-5",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Rhythms of ghrelin, leptin, and sleep in rats

T2 - Effects of the normal diurnal cycle, restricted feeding, and sleep deprivation

AU - Bodosi, B.

AU - Gardi, J.

AU - Hajdu, I.

AU - Szentirmai, E.

AU - Obal, F.

AU - Krueger, J. M.

PY - 2004/11

Y1 - 2004/11

N2 - To determine the relationships among plasma ghrelin and leptin concentrations and hypothalamic ghrelin contents, and sleep, cortical brain temperature (Tcrt), and feeding, we determined these parameters in rats in three experimental conditions: in free-feeding rats with normal diurnal rhythms, in rats with feeding restricted to the 12-h light period (RF), and in rats subjected to 5-h of sleep deprivation (SD) at the beginning of the light cycle. Plasma ghrelin and leptin displayed diurnal rhythms with the ghrelin peak preceding and the leptin peak following the major daily feeding peak in hour 1 after dark onset. RF reversed the diurnal rhythm of these hormones and the rhythm of rapid-eye-movement sleep (REMS) and significantly altered the rhythm of Tcrt. In contrast, the duration and intensity of non-REMS (NREMS) were hardly responsive to RF. SD failed to change leptin concentrations, but it promptly stimulated plasma ghrelin and induced eating. SD elicited biphasic variations in the hypothalamic ghrelin contents. SD increased plasma corticosterone, but corticosterone did not seem to influence either leptin or ghrelin. The results suggest a strong relationship between feeding and the diurnal rhythm of leptin and that feeding also fundamentally modulates the diurnal rhythm of ghrelin. The variations in hypothalamic ghrelin contents might be associated with sleep-wake activity in rats, but, unlike the previous observations in humans, obvious links could not be detected between sleep and the diurnal rhythms of plasma concentrations of either ghrelin or leptin in the rat.

AB - To determine the relationships among plasma ghrelin and leptin concentrations and hypothalamic ghrelin contents, and sleep, cortical brain temperature (Tcrt), and feeding, we determined these parameters in rats in three experimental conditions: in free-feeding rats with normal diurnal rhythms, in rats with feeding restricted to the 12-h light period (RF), and in rats subjected to 5-h of sleep deprivation (SD) at the beginning of the light cycle. Plasma ghrelin and leptin displayed diurnal rhythms with the ghrelin peak preceding and the leptin peak following the major daily feeding peak in hour 1 after dark onset. RF reversed the diurnal rhythm of these hormones and the rhythm of rapid-eye-movement sleep (REMS) and significantly altered the rhythm of Tcrt. In contrast, the duration and intensity of non-REMS (NREMS) were hardly responsive to RF. SD failed to change leptin concentrations, but it promptly stimulated plasma ghrelin and induced eating. SD elicited biphasic variations in the hypothalamic ghrelin contents. SD increased plasma corticosterone, but corticosterone did not seem to influence either leptin or ghrelin. The results suggest a strong relationship between feeding and the diurnal rhythm of leptin and that feeding also fundamentally modulates the diurnal rhythm of ghrelin. The variations in hypothalamic ghrelin contents might be associated with sleep-wake activity in rats, but, unlike the previous observations in humans, obvious links could not be detected between sleep and the diurnal rhythms of plasma concentrations of either ghrelin or leptin in the rat.

KW - Brain temperature

KW - Corticosterone

KW - Electroen-cephalogram delta power

KW - Hypothalamic ghrelin

KW - Sleep duration

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=6344267074&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=6344267074&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1152/ajpregu.00294.2004

DO - 10.1152/ajpregu.00294.2004

M3 - Article

C2 - 15475503

AN - SCOPUS:6344267074

VL - 287

JO - American Journal of Physiology

JF - American Journal of Physiology

SN - 0363-6119

IS - 5 56-5

ER -