Retrospective characterization of Newcastle Disease Virus Antrim '73 in relation to other epidemics, past and present

K. O'Donoghue, B. Lomniczi, B. McFerran, T. J. Connor, B. Seal, D. King, J. Banks, R. Manvell, P. S. White, K. Richmond, P. Jackson, M. Hugh-Jones

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

3 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

In November 1973 Newcastle disease suddenly appeared in Northern Ireland, where the viscerotropic disease had not been seen in 3 1/2 years and the two Irelands had been regarded as largely disease free for 30 years. It was successfully controlled with only 36 confirmed affected layer flocks, plus 10 more slaughtered as 'dangerous contacts'. Contemporary investigations failed to reveal the source of the Irish epidemic. Using archival virus samples from most of the affected flocks, RT-PCR was conducted with primers selected for all six NDV genes. Phylogenetic analyses of three genes, HN, M and F, confirmed vaccine as the cause of one of the outbreaks. The other six samples were identical and closely related to previous outbreaks in the United States and western Europe initiated by infected imported Latin American parrots. The probable cause of the epidemic followed from the importation from The Netherlands of bulk feed grains contaminated with infected pigeon faeces.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)357-368
Number of pages12
JournalEpidemiology and Infection
Volume132
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Apr 2004

Fingerprint

Newcastle disease virus
Disease Outbreaks
Newcastle Disease
Parrots
Northern Ireland
Columbidae
Ireland
Feces
Netherlands
Genes
Vaccines
Viruses
Polymerase Chain Reaction

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health
  • Immunology

Cite this

Retrospective characterization of Newcastle Disease Virus Antrim '73 in relation to other epidemics, past and present. / O'Donoghue, K.; Lomniczi, B.; McFerran, B.; Connor, T. J.; Seal, B.; King, D.; Banks, J.; Manvell, R.; White, P. S.; Richmond, K.; Jackson, P.; Hugh-Jones, M.

In: Epidemiology and Infection, Vol. 132, No. 2, 04.2004, p. 357-368.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

O'Donoghue, K, Lomniczi, B, McFerran, B, Connor, TJ, Seal, B, King, D, Banks, J, Manvell, R, White, PS, Richmond, K, Jackson, P & Hugh-Jones, M 2004, 'Retrospective characterization of Newcastle Disease Virus Antrim '73 in relation to other epidemics, past and present', Epidemiology and Infection, vol. 132, no. 2, pp. 357-368. https://doi.org/10.1017/S0950268803001778
O'Donoghue, K. ; Lomniczi, B. ; McFerran, B. ; Connor, T. J. ; Seal, B. ; King, D. ; Banks, J. ; Manvell, R. ; White, P. S. ; Richmond, K. ; Jackson, P. ; Hugh-Jones, M. / Retrospective characterization of Newcastle Disease Virus Antrim '73 in relation to other epidemics, past and present. In: Epidemiology and Infection. 2004 ; Vol. 132, No. 2. pp. 357-368.
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