Retinoid receptor-activating ligands are produced within the mouse thymus during postnatal development

Ildikó Kiss, Ralph Rühl, Éva Szegezdi, Britta Fritzsche, B. Tóth, J. Pongrácz, Thomas Perlmann, L. Fésüs, Z. Szondy

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

25 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Vitamin A deficiency is known to be accompanied with immune deficiency and susceptibility to a wide range of infectious diseases. Experimental evidence suggests that the active metabolites of vitamin A that mediate its effects on the immune system are the retinoic acids (RA), which are ligands for the nuclear RA receptor (RAR) family. RA were previously shown both to promote proliferation and to regulate apoptosis of thymocytes. In this study we detected the age-dependent mRNA expression of retinaldehyde dehydrogenases (RALDH1 and 2), cellular RA binding protein-II and CYP26A, proteins responsible for the synthesis, nuclear transport and degradation of RA in the postnatally developing thymus. RALDH1 was located in thymic epithelial cells. However, the amount of all-trans RA in thymic homogenates was close to the detection limit, suggesting that in this tissue all-trans RA is not the main RAR-regulating product of retinol metabolism. At the same time, by measuring the induction of a RAR-responsive transgene in two independent transgenic mouse strains, we demonstrated the production of an RAR-activating ligand, which was age and RALDH dependent. Our data provide evidence for the existence of endogenous retinoid synthesis in the thymus and suggest that retinoids similar to glucocorticoids might indeed be involved in the regulation of thymic proliferation and selection processes by being present in the thymus in functionally effective amounts.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)147-155
Number of pages9
JournalEuropean Journal of Immunology
Volume38
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jan 2008

Fingerprint

Retinoids
Tretinoin
Thymus Gland
Ligands
Vitamin A
Retinaldehyde
Vitamin A Deficiency
Retinoic Acid Receptors
Cell Nucleus Active Transport
Thymocytes
Transgenes
Transgenic Mice
Glucocorticoids
Communicable Diseases
Limit of Detection
Immune System
Oxidoreductases
Epithelial Cells
Apoptosis
Messenger RNA

Keywords

  • Developmental immunology
  • Retinoid metabolism
  • Signal transduction
  • Thymic selection

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Immunology

Cite this

Retinoid receptor-activating ligands are produced within the mouse thymus during postnatal development. / Kiss, Ildikó; Rühl, Ralph; Szegezdi, Éva; Fritzsche, Britta; Tóth, B.; Pongrácz, J.; Perlmann, Thomas; Fésüs, L.; Szondy, Z.

In: European Journal of Immunology, Vol. 38, No. 1, 01.2008, p. 147-155.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Kiss, Ildikó ; Rühl, Ralph ; Szegezdi, Éva ; Fritzsche, Britta ; Tóth, B. ; Pongrácz, J. ; Perlmann, Thomas ; Fésüs, L. ; Szondy, Z. / Retinoid receptor-activating ligands are produced within the mouse thymus during postnatal development. In: European Journal of Immunology. 2008 ; Vol. 38, No. 1. pp. 147-155.
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