Resurgence of rabies in Hungary during 2013–2014

An attempt to track the origin of identified strains

A. Hornyák, T. Juhász, B. Forró, S. Kecskeméti, K. Bányai

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

In 2013–2014, accumulation of rabies episodes raised concerns regarding ongoing elimination programme in Hungary. Nearly four dozen cases were identified over a 13-month period in the central region of the country far behind the immunization zones. Although the outbreak was successfully controlled, the origin of disease remained unknown. In this study, we sequenced the partial N and G genes from 47 Hungarian rabies virus (RV) strains isolated from the 2013–2014 outbreak. Sequencing and phylogenetic analysis of the N and G genes showed that the Hungarian RV isolates share high nucleotide similarity among each other (up to 100%). When analysing the N gene, comparable sequence similarity was seen between the outbreak strains and some historic Romanian RV strains. Unfortunately, in the lack of available sequence data from the Romanian RV strains, the genetic relationship within the G gene could not be determined. Phylogenetic analysis of Hungarian RV isolates detected in the past revealed that multiple independent RV lineages circulated in our country over the past 25 years. The parental strain of the 2013–2014 outbreak may have been imported independently perhaps from east through transborder movement of a reservoir animal. Next to the introduction, this imported RV strain seems to have spread clonally in the affected area. Our findings indicate that despite effective control measures that, overall, minimized the incidence of rabies over the past decade, field and laboratory monitoring needs to be continued to make rabies elimination programme in Hungary successful.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)e14-e24
JournalTransboundary and Emerging Diseases
Volume65
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Feb 1 2018

Fingerprint

Rabies virus
Rabies
Hungary
rabies
Disease Outbreaks
Genes
genes
phylogeny
genetic relationships
control methods
Immunization
immunization
Nucleotides
nucleotides
nucleotide sequences
incidence
monitoring
Incidence

Keywords

  • Hungary
  • molecular epidemiology
  • nucleoprotein
  • Rabies lyssavirus

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Immunology and Microbiology(all)
  • veterinary(all)

Cite this

Resurgence of rabies in Hungary during 2013–2014 : An attempt to track the origin of identified strains. / Hornyák, A.; Juhász, T.; Forró, B.; Kecskeméti, S.; Bányai, K.

In: Transboundary and Emerging Diseases, Vol. 65, No. 1, 01.02.2018, p. e14-e24.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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