Restoration and deterioration of function by brain grafts in the septohippocampal system

G. Buzsaki, T. Freund, A. Bjorklund, F. H. Gage

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

11 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Our experiments, using the septohippocampal model to study the mechanisms of action of brain grafts, suggest that a likely mechanism of restoration of physiological activity of the deafferented hippocampus is a 'passive' bridging action of the graft between the host septum and hippocampus. In addition, we have demonstrated reciprocal physiological and anatomical connections between the graft and host. Finally, we report that hippocampal grafts can serve as an implanted epileptic focus, which may further worsen the function of the already damaged brain. Further experiments are required to determine why under certain conditions the grafts produce epileptic actvity while under seemingly similar conditions they lead to the restoration of physiological function of damaged brain circuitries.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)69-77
Number of pages9
JournalProgress in Brain Research
Volume78
Publication statusPublished - 1988

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Transplants
Brain
Hippocampus

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Neuroscience(all)

Cite this

Restoration and deterioration of function by brain grafts in the septohippocampal system. / Buzsaki, G.; Freund, T.; Bjorklund, A.; Gage, F. H.

In: Progress in Brain Research, Vol. 78, 1988, p. 69-77.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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