Restless legs syndrome and all-cause mortality in four prospective cohort studies

A. Szentkirályi, Anke C. Winter, Markus Schürks, Henry Völzke, Wolfgang Hoffmann, Julie E. Buring, J. Michael Gaziano, Tobias Kurth, Klaus Berger

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

22 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objectives: To evaluate the association between restless legs syndrome (RLS) and all-cause mortality. Design: Four prospective cohort studies. Setting: The Dortmund Health Study (DHS) and the Study of Health in Pomerania (SHIP) from Germany. The Women's Health Study (WHS) and the Physicians' Health Study (PHS) from the USA. Participants: In DHS: a random sample (n=1 299) from the population of Dortmund; in SHIP: a sample (n=4 291) from residents living in West Pomerania were drawn by multistage random sampling design; in WHS: female healthcare professionals (n=31 370); in PHS: male physicians (n=22 926) Main outcome measures: All-cause mortality. Results: The prevalence of RLS ranged between 7.4% and 11.9% at baseline. During follow-up (ranging between 6 and 11 years) RLS was not associated with increased risk of all-cause mortality in any of the four cohorts. The multivariable-adjusted HRs (95% CI) for all-cause mortality ranged from 0.21 (0.03 to 1.53) to 1.07 (0.93 to 1.23) across the four studies. The HRs for all-cause mortality did not differ according to gender. Conclusions: In these four independently conducted large prospective cohort studies from Germany and the USA, RLS did not increase the risk of all-cause mortality. These findings do not support the hypothesis that RLS is a risk factor for mortality of any cause.

Original languageEnglish
Article numbere001652
JournalBMJ Open
Volume2
Issue number6
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2012

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Restless Legs Syndrome
Cohort Studies
Prospective Studies
Mortality
Health
Women's Health
Physicians
Germany
Outcome Assessment (Health Care)
Delivery of Health Care
Population

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Szentkirályi, A., Winter, A. C., Schürks, M., Völzke, H., Hoffmann, W., Buring, J. E., ... Berger, K. (2012). Restless legs syndrome and all-cause mortality in four prospective cohort studies. BMJ Open, 2(6), [e001652]. https://doi.org/10.1136/bmjopen-2012-001652

Restless legs syndrome and all-cause mortality in four prospective cohort studies. / Szentkirályi, A.; Winter, Anke C.; Schürks, Markus; Völzke, Henry; Hoffmann, Wolfgang; Buring, Julie E.; Gaziano, J. Michael; Kurth, Tobias; Berger, Klaus.

In: BMJ Open, Vol. 2, No. 6, e001652, 2012.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Szentkirályi, A, Winter, AC, Schürks, M, Völzke, H, Hoffmann, W, Buring, JE, Gaziano, JM, Kurth, T & Berger, K 2012, 'Restless legs syndrome and all-cause mortality in four prospective cohort studies', BMJ Open, vol. 2, no. 6, e001652. https://doi.org/10.1136/bmjopen-2012-001652
Szentkirályi, A. ; Winter, Anke C. ; Schürks, Markus ; Völzke, Henry ; Hoffmann, Wolfgang ; Buring, Julie E. ; Gaziano, J. Michael ; Kurth, Tobias ; Berger, Klaus. / Restless legs syndrome and all-cause mortality in four prospective cohort studies. In: BMJ Open. 2012 ; Vol. 2, No. 6.
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AB - Objectives: To evaluate the association between restless legs syndrome (RLS) and all-cause mortality. Design: Four prospective cohort studies. Setting: The Dortmund Health Study (DHS) and the Study of Health in Pomerania (SHIP) from Germany. The Women's Health Study (WHS) and the Physicians' Health Study (PHS) from the USA. Participants: In DHS: a random sample (n=1 299) from the population of Dortmund; in SHIP: a sample (n=4 291) from residents living in West Pomerania were drawn by multistage random sampling design; in WHS: female healthcare professionals (n=31 370); in PHS: male physicians (n=22 926) Main outcome measures: All-cause mortality. Results: The prevalence of RLS ranged between 7.4% and 11.9% at baseline. During follow-up (ranging between 6 and 11 years) RLS was not associated with increased risk of all-cause mortality in any of the four cohorts. The multivariable-adjusted HRs (95% CI) for all-cause mortality ranged from 0.21 (0.03 to 1.53) to 1.07 (0.93 to 1.23) across the four studies. The HRs for all-cause mortality did not differ according to gender. Conclusions: In these four independently conducted large prospective cohort studies from Germany and the USA, RLS did not increase the risk of all-cause mortality. These findings do not support the hypothesis that RLS is a risk factor for mortality of any cause.

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