Resting-state fMRI data of awake dogs (Canis familiaris) via group-level independent component analysis reveal multiple, spatially distributed resting-state networks

Dóra Szabó, Kálmán Czeibert, Ádám Kettinger, Márta Gácsi, Attila Andics, Ádám Miklósi, Enikő Kubinyi

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Resting-state networks are spatially distributed, functionally connected brain regions. Studying these networks gives us information about the large-scale functional organization of the brain and alternations in these networks are considered to play a role in a wide range of neurological conditions and aging. To describe resting-state networks in dogs, we measured 22 awake, unrestrained individuals of both sexes and carried out group-level spatial independent component analysis to explore whole-brain connectivity patterns. In this exploratory study, using resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging (rs-fMRI), we found several such networks: a network involving prefrontal, anterior cingulate, posterior cingulate and hippocampal regions; sensorimotor (SMN), auditory (AUD), frontal (FRO), cerebellar (CER) and striatal networks. The network containing posterior cingulate regions, similarly to Primates, but unlike previous studies in dogs, showed antero-posterior connectedness with involvement of hippocampal and lateral temporal regions. The results give insight into the resting-state networks of awake animals from a taxon beyond rodents through a non-invasive method.

Original languageEnglish
Article number15270
JournalScientific reports
Volume9
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Dec 1 2019

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Gyrus Cinguli
Magnetic Resonance Imaging
Dogs
Brain
Corpus Striatum
Temporal Lobe
Primates
Rodentia

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • General

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Resting-state fMRI data of awake dogs (Canis familiaris) via group-level independent component analysis reveal multiple, spatially distributed resting-state networks. / Szabó, Dóra; Czeibert, Kálmán; Kettinger, Ádám; Gácsi, Márta; Andics, Attila; Miklósi, Ádám; Kubinyi, Enikő.

In: Scientific reports, Vol. 9, No. 1, 15270, 01.12.2019.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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