Responses of monkey inferior temporal neurons to luminance-, motion-, and texture-defined gratings

G. Sáry, R. Vogels, G. Kovacs, G. A. Orban

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

68 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

1. We recorded from neurons responsive to gratings in the inferior temporal (IT) cortices of macaque monkeys. One of the monkeys performed an orientation discrimination task; the other maintained fixation during stimulus presentation. Stimuli consisted of gratings based on discontinuities in luminance, relative motion, and texture. 2. IT cells responded well to gratings defined solely by relative motion, implying either direct or indirect motion input into IT, an area that is part of the ventral visual cortical pathway. 3. Response strength in general did not depend on the cue used to define the gratings. Latency values observed for the two static grating types (luminance- and texture-defined gratings) were similar, but significantly shorter than those measured for the kinetic gratings. 4. Stimulus orientation had a significant effect in 27%, 27%, and 9% of the cells tested with luminance-, kinetic-, and texture-defined gratings, respectively. 5. Only a small proportion of cells were orientation sensitive for more than one defining cue. The average preferred orientation for luminance and kinetic gratings matched; the tuning width was similar for the two cues. 6. Our results indicate that IT cells may contribute to cue- invariant coding of boundaries and edges. We discuss the relevance of these results to visual perception.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1341-1354
Number of pages14
JournalJournal of Neurophysiology
Volume73
Issue number4
Publication statusPublished - 1995

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Haplorhini
Cues
Neurons
Visual Perception
Visual Pathways
Macaca
Temporal Lobe

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Physiology
  • Neuroscience(all)

Cite this

Responses of monkey inferior temporal neurons to luminance-, motion-, and texture-defined gratings. / Sáry, G.; Vogels, R.; Kovacs, G.; Orban, G. A.

In: Journal of Neurophysiology, Vol. 73, No. 4, 1995, p. 1341-1354.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Sáry, G. ; Vogels, R. ; Kovacs, G. ; Orban, G. A. / Responses of monkey inferior temporal neurons to luminance-, motion-, and texture-defined gratings. In: Journal of Neurophysiology. 1995 ; Vol. 73, No. 4. pp. 1341-1354.
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