Research trends: Comparison of vehicle powertrains

P. Mizsey, E. Newson

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Four mobile powertrain developments compared with the gasoline internal combustion engine for well-to-wheel efficiencies, CO2 emissions, and investment costs. Although the ICE has lowest investment cost, it is not competitive in well-to-wheel efficiency, and worse than the alternatives for CO2 emissions. The hybrid diesel has the highest well-to-wheel efficiency (30%), but well-to-wheel CO2 emissions are similar to the fuel cell using compressed hydrogen produced on a centralized petrochemical basis. The latter case has the advantage over the hybrid diesel in that CO2 emissions are concentrated and easier to control. Only on-board reforming of methanol offers the possibility of using a renewable energy source (biomass). This is an abstract of an article originally published in J. of Power Sources 102(1/2) 205-209 (1 December 2001).

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)13
Number of pages1
JournalFuel Cells Bulletin
Volume2002
Issue number3
Publication statusPublished - Mar 2002

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Powertrains
Wheels
Reforming reactions
Internal combustion engines
Petrochemicals
Gasoline
Methanol
Costs
Fuel cells
Hydrogen
Biomass
CO2 emissions
Research trends

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Chemical Engineering(all)
  • Fuel Technology

Cite this

Research trends : Comparison of vehicle powertrains. / Mizsey, P.; Newson, E.

In: Fuel Cells Bulletin, Vol. 2002, No. 3, 03.2002, p. 13.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Mizsey, P. ; Newson, E. / Research trends : Comparison of vehicle powertrains. In: Fuel Cells Bulletin. 2002 ; Vol. 2002, No. 3. pp. 13.
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