Az ellés utáni idoszak szaporodásbiológiai gondozása tejhasznú tehenészetekben

Translated title of the contribution: Reproductive management of dairy cows in the postpartum period

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Achievement of an optimum calving to conception interval of 85 to 115 days requires concentrated management activities during the first 90 days following calving. Early postpartum breeding in dairy cows results in more calves, and higher milk production per lactation. To achieve this goal, careful surveillance at calving has to be assured. Surveillance at calving has two objectives. One is to avoid the loss of the present calf by intervening early enough to save it but not so early to make things difficult for an as yet undilated dam. The other is to avoid trauma and infection of the tract, which are more likely to occur in cows in which dystocia is present for more than four hours. Selection against families that encounter problems of maternal-fetal disproportion and resultant dystocia are also important. Postnatal examination and treatment are recommended in all cows reported to have dystocia or postparturient problems, such as retained placenta, milk fever, or acetonemia. All these complications can directly increase the intercalving period and should be recognised and treated as soon as possible. Accurate and early detection of pregnancy also plays a key role in achieving an optimal calving to conception interval. Transrectal ultrasonography (7.5 MHz linear-array transducer) was used to evaluate the accuracy of finding a corpus luteum on Day 20 or 21 or a conceptus on Day 29 or 30 after service. All of the cows with non-pregnancy diagnoses and having a corpus luteum were reexamined on Day 33 or 34 after AI. The final ultrasound (US) examination was made between Days 53 to 58 after service. Some non-pregnant cows (n=20) could already be recognised by the absence of a corpus luteum at the first US examination on Day 20 or 21 after AI and these cows might be treated at this early stage if needed (Table 1). The false negative US diagnoses (n=7) made on Day 29 or 30 after AI could be corrected on the basis of repeated US examinations 3 to 4 days later (Table 2). With the exception of one cow every non-pregnant cow was correctly diagnosed by Day 29 or 30 after AI and these cows might be treated at this stage if needed. Three to four US examinations might contribute beneficially to the achievement of optimal calving to conception interval in field conditions. The simple monitoring of reproductive status and the intensive treatment of postparturient diseases will not of itself encourage greater reproductive efficiency. Cows should be challenge-fed during early lactation to minimise the negative energy balance. It appears that cows in significant negative energy balance sustain damage to the developing population of follicles that are recruited for ovulation 2 to 3 months later. The most favoured biologic treatment to restore oestrous cycling after parturition Is the maintenance of good condition at calving and the provision of a high-energy diet that does not produce a fatty liver in early lactation.

Original languageHungarian
Pages (from-to)78-81
Number of pages4
JournalMagyar Allatorvosok Lapja
Volume121
Issue number2
Publication statusPublished - 1999

Fingerprint

Dystocia
Corpus Luteum
postpartum period
Lactation
Postpartum Period
dairy cows
cows
calving
Milk
Retained Placenta
Ketosis
Fatty Liver
dystocia
Ovulation
Transducers
Breeding
corpus luteum
Ultrasonography
Fever
Mothers

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • veterinary(all)

Cite this

Az ellés utáni idoszak szaporodásbiológiai gondozása tejhasznú tehenészetekben. / Szenci, O.

In: Magyar Allatorvosok Lapja, Vol. 121, No. 2, 1999, p. 78-81.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

@article{d8261c38a406432a8869d6fb4d768594,
title = "Az ell{\'e}s ut{\'a}ni idoszak szaporod{\'a}sbiol{\'o}giai gondoz{\'a}sa tejhaszn{\'u} tehen{\'e}szetekben",
abstract = "Achievement of an optimum calving to conception interval of 85 to 115 days requires concentrated management activities during the first 90 days following calving. Early postpartum breeding in dairy cows results in more calves, and higher milk production per lactation. To achieve this goal, careful surveillance at calving has to be assured. Surveillance at calving has two objectives. One is to avoid the loss of the present calf by intervening early enough to save it but not so early to make things difficult for an as yet undilated dam. The other is to avoid trauma and infection of the tract, which are more likely to occur in cows in which dystocia is present for more than four hours. Selection against families that encounter problems of maternal-fetal disproportion and resultant dystocia are also important. Postnatal examination and treatment are recommended in all cows reported to have dystocia or postparturient problems, such as retained placenta, milk fever, or acetonemia. All these complications can directly increase the intercalving period and should be recognised and treated as soon as possible. Accurate and early detection of pregnancy also plays a key role in achieving an optimal calving to conception interval. Transrectal ultrasonography (7.5 MHz linear-array transducer) was used to evaluate the accuracy of finding a corpus luteum on Day 20 or 21 or a conceptus on Day 29 or 30 after service. All of the cows with non-pregnancy diagnoses and having a corpus luteum were reexamined on Day 33 or 34 after AI. The final ultrasound (US) examination was made between Days 53 to 58 after service. Some non-pregnant cows (n=20) could already be recognised by the absence of a corpus luteum at the first US examination on Day 20 or 21 after AI and these cows might be treated at this early stage if needed (Table 1). The false negative US diagnoses (n=7) made on Day 29 or 30 after AI could be corrected on the basis of repeated US examinations 3 to 4 days later (Table 2). With the exception of one cow every non-pregnant cow was correctly diagnosed by Day 29 or 30 after AI and these cows might be treated at this stage if needed. Three to four US examinations might contribute beneficially to the achievement of optimal calving to conception interval in field conditions. The simple monitoring of reproductive status and the intensive treatment of postparturient diseases will not of itself encourage greater reproductive efficiency. Cows should be challenge-fed during early lactation to minimise the negative energy balance. It appears that cows in significant negative energy balance sustain damage to the developing population of follicles that are recruited for ovulation 2 to 3 months later. The most favoured biologic treatment to restore oestrous cycling after parturition Is the maintenance of good condition at calving and the provision of a high-energy diet that does not produce a fatty liver in early lactation.",
author = "O. Szenci",
year = "1999",
language = "Hungarian",
volume = "121",
pages = "78--81",
journal = "Magyar Allatorvosok Lapja",
issn = "0025-004X",
publisher = "Magyar Mezogazdasag Ltd",
number = "2",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Az ellés utáni idoszak szaporodásbiológiai gondozása tejhasznú tehenészetekben

AU - Szenci, O.

PY - 1999

Y1 - 1999

N2 - Achievement of an optimum calving to conception interval of 85 to 115 days requires concentrated management activities during the first 90 days following calving. Early postpartum breeding in dairy cows results in more calves, and higher milk production per lactation. To achieve this goal, careful surveillance at calving has to be assured. Surveillance at calving has two objectives. One is to avoid the loss of the present calf by intervening early enough to save it but not so early to make things difficult for an as yet undilated dam. The other is to avoid trauma and infection of the tract, which are more likely to occur in cows in which dystocia is present for more than four hours. Selection against families that encounter problems of maternal-fetal disproportion and resultant dystocia are also important. Postnatal examination and treatment are recommended in all cows reported to have dystocia or postparturient problems, such as retained placenta, milk fever, or acetonemia. All these complications can directly increase the intercalving period and should be recognised and treated as soon as possible. Accurate and early detection of pregnancy also plays a key role in achieving an optimal calving to conception interval. Transrectal ultrasonography (7.5 MHz linear-array transducer) was used to evaluate the accuracy of finding a corpus luteum on Day 20 or 21 or a conceptus on Day 29 or 30 after service. All of the cows with non-pregnancy diagnoses and having a corpus luteum were reexamined on Day 33 or 34 after AI. The final ultrasound (US) examination was made between Days 53 to 58 after service. Some non-pregnant cows (n=20) could already be recognised by the absence of a corpus luteum at the first US examination on Day 20 or 21 after AI and these cows might be treated at this early stage if needed (Table 1). The false negative US diagnoses (n=7) made on Day 29 or 30 after AI could be corrected on the basis of repeated US examinations 3 to 4 days later (Table 2). With the exception of one cow every non-pregnant cow was correctly diagnosed by Day 29 or 30 after AI and these cows might be treated at this stage if needed. Three to four US examinations might contribute beneficially to the achievement of optimal calving to conception interval in field conditions. The simple monitoring of reproductive status and the intensive treatment of postparturient diseases will not of itself encourage greater reproductive efficiency. Cows should be challenge-fed during early lactation to minimise the negative energy balance. It appears that cows in significant negative energy balance sustain damage to the developing population of follicles that are recruited for ovulation 2 to 3 months later. The most favoured biologic treatment to restore oestrous cycling after parturition Is the maintenance of good condition at calving and the provision of a high-energy diet that does not produce a fatty liver in early lactation.

AB - Achievement of an optimum calving to conception interval of 85 to 115 days requires concentrated management activities during the first 90 days following calving. Early postpartum breeding in dairy cows results in more calves, and higher milk production per lactation. To achieve this goal, careful surveillance at calving has to be assured. Surveillance at calving has two objectives. One is to avoid the loss of the present calf by intervening early enough to save it but not so early to make things difficult for an as yet undilated dam. The other is to avoid trauma and infection of the tract, which are more likely to occur in cows in which dystocia is present for more than four hours. Selection against families that encounter problems of maternal-fetal disproportion and resultant dystocia are also important. Postnatal examination and treatment are recommended in all cows reported to have dystocia or postparturient problems, such as retained placenta, milk fever, or acetonemia. All these complications can directly increase the intercalving period and should be recognised and treated as soon as possible. Accurate and early detection of pregnancy also plays a key role in achieving an optimal calving to conception interval. Transrectal ultrasonography (7.5 MHz linear-array transducer) was used to evaluate the accuracy of finding a corpus luteum on Day 20 or 21 or a conceptus on Day 29 or 30 after service. All of the cows with non-pregnancy diagnoses and having a corpus luteum were reexamined on Day 33 or 34 after AI. The final ultrasound (US) examination was made between Days 53 to 58 after service. Some non-pregnant cows (n=20) could already be recognised by the absence of a corpus luteum at the first US examination on Day 20 or 21 after AI and these cows might be treated at this early stage if needed (Table 1). The false negative US diagnoses (n=7) made on Day 29 or 30 after AI could be corrected on the basis of repeated US examinations 3 to 4 days later (Table 2). With the exception of one cow every non-pregnant cow was correctly diagnosed by Day 29 or 30 after AI and these cows might be treated at this stage if needed. Three to four US examinations might contribute beneficially to the achievement of optimal calving to conception interval in field conditions. The simple monitoring of reproductive status and the intensive treatment of postparturient diseases will not of itself encourage greater reproductive efficiency. Cows should be challenge-fed during early lactation to minimise the negative energy balance. It appears that cows in significant negative energy balance sustain damage to the developing population of follicles that are recruited for ovulation 2 to 3 months later. The most favoured biologic treatment to restore oestrous cycling after parturition Is the maintenance of good condition at calving and the provision of a high-energy diet that does not produce a fatty liver in early lactation.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=0033466969&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=0033466969&partnerID=8YFLogxK

M3 - Article

AN - SCOPUS:0033466969

VL - 121

SP - 78

EP - 81

JO - Magyar Allatorvosok Lapja

JF - Magyar Allatorvosok Lapja

SN - 0025-004X

IS - 2

ER -