Remifentanil in combination with ketamine versus remifentanil in spinal fusion surgery - A double blind study

B. A. Hadi, R. Al Ramadani, R. Daas, I. Naylor, R. Zelkó

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

15 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Aim: This study is aimed at conducting a program for two different anesthetic methods used during a spinal fusion surgery to ensure better intra-operative hemodynamic stability and post-operative pain control. Methods: A prospective, randomized, double blind study in patients scheduled for spinal fusion surgery, who were randomly allocated to two groups, G1 and G2, (n = 15 per group), class I - II ASA, was carried out. Both groups received pre-operatively midazolam, followed intra-operatively by propofol, sevoflurane, atracurium, and either remifentanil infusion 0.2 μg/kg/min (G1), or the same dose of remifentanil infusion and low doses of ketamine infusion 1 μg/ kg/min (G2) anesthetics, antidote medication and post-operative morphine doses. HR, MAP, vital signs, surgical bleeding, urine output, duration of surgery and duration of anesthesia were recorded. In a 24-h recovery period in a post-anesthesia care unit (PACU) the recovery time, the first pain score and analgesic requirements were measured. Results: Intra-operative HR and arterial BP were significantly less (p <0.05) in G1 as compared to G2. In the PACU the first pain scores were significantly less (p <0.05) in G2 than in G1. The time for the first patient analgesia demand dose was greater in G2, as also morphine consumption which was greater in G1 than G2 (p <0.05). Other results were the same. None of the patients had any adverse drug reaction. Conclusions: Adding low doses of ketamine hydrochloride could be a routine therapy to improve the hemodynamic stability and reduce the post-operative morphine consumption during spinal fusion surgery.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)542-548
Number of pages7
JournalInternational Journal of Clinical Pharmacology and Therapeutics
Volume48
Issue number8
Publication statusPublished - Aug 2010

Fingerprint

Spinal Fusion
Ketamine
Double-Blind Method
Morphine
Anesthesia
Pain
Anesthetics
Hemodynamics
Atracurium
Antidotes
Vital Signs
Midazolam
Propofol
Drug-Related Side Effects and Adverse Reactions
Analgesia
Analgesics
Urine
Hemorrhage
remifentanil
Therapeutics

Keywords

  • Hemodynamic stability
  • Ketamine
  • Postoperative analgesia
  • Remifetanil
  • Spinal fusion surgery

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pharmacology
  • Pharmacology (medical)

Cite this

Remifentanil in combination with ketamine versus remifentanil in spinal fusion surgery - A double blind study. / Hadi, B. A.; Al Ramadani, R.; Daas, R.; Naylor, I.; Zelkó, R.

In: International Journal of Clinical Pharmacology and Therapeutics, Vol. 48, No. 8, 08.2010, p. 542-548.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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