Relative permittivity of polar liquids, comparison of theory, experiment, and simulation

Mónika Valiskò, D. Boda

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

19 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

A molecular-based second-order perturbation theory is applied to calculate the relative permittivity of polar liquids. Our basic model is the dipolar hard sphere fluid. The main purpose of this work is to propose various approaches to take into account the molecular polarizability. In the continuum approach, we apply the Kirkwood-Fröhlich equation and use the high-frequency relative permittivity. The Kirkwood g-factor representing molecular correlations is calculated by a perturbation theory. In the molecular approach, the molecular polarizability is built into the model on the molecular level (the polarizable dipolar hard sphere fluid). To calculate the relative permittivity of this system, an equation obtained from a renormalization procedure is used. In both approaches, we apply a series expansion for the relative permittivity and show that these series expansions give results in better agreement with simulation data than the original equations. After testing our theoretical equations against our own Monte Carlo simulation results, we compare the results obtained from our theoretical equations and simulations to experimental data for amines, ethers, and halogenated, sulfur, and hydroxy compounds. We propose a procedure to calculate potential parameters (hard sphere diameter, reduced polarizability, and reduced dipole moment) from experimental data such as the permanent dipole moment, refractive index, density, and temperature. We show that for compounds of low relative permittivity the polarizable dipolar hard sphere (PDHS) model and the continuum approach give reasonable results. For nonassociative liquids of higher relative permittivity, the PDHS model overestimates experimental data due to unsatisfactory representation of the shape of the molecules. In the case of associative liquids, the PDHS model works well, and in some cases it underestimates the experimental values due to the unsatisfactory treatment of electrostatic interactions.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)6355-6365
Number of pages11
JournalJournal of Physical Chemistry B
Volume109
Issue number13
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Apr 7 2005

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Permittivity
permittivity
Liquids
liquids
simulation
Experiments
Dipole moment
series expansion
dipole moments
perturbation theory
continuums
Fluids
Ethers
fluids
data simulation
Coulomb interactions
Sulfur
Amines
ethers
Refractive index

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Physical and Theoretical Chemistry

Cite this

Relative permittivity of polar liquids, comparison of theory, experiment, and simulation. / Valiskò, Mónika; Boda, D.

In: Journal of Physical Chemistry B, Vol. 109, No. 13, 07.04.2005, p. 6355-6365.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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