Relationship between biomechanical factors and vascular reactions during activation by physiological doses of norepinephrine and vasopressin in vitro

E. Monos, R. H. Cox, L. H. Peterson

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Abstract

Cylindrical segments of canine iliac (IA) and common carotid (CC) arteries were used to study the relation between the mechanical condition of the vessel wall and smooth muscle contractions elicited by physiological doses of vasoactive hormones in vitro. Effects of arginine vasopressin (VPA; 150 μU/ml) and norepinephrine (NE; 0.5 μg/ml) were determined on tangential strain and three dimensional stresses developing during slow elevation (100 mmHg/min) of the intraluminal pressure in 0-250 mmHg range at axial isometry. It was found that maximum outer diameter reduction (active tangential strain) caused by NE was about 7-8% in CC, and 20% in IA developing at 53-66 and 33-37 mmHg pressure, respectively. Maximum active stresses were around 4-6x105 dynes/cm2 in tangential, 0.6-1x105 dynes/cm2 in axial and -2x104 dynes/cm2 in radial directions. Though the maximum active strain developed at much lower passive initial strain and stress than the maximum active stress in both CC and IA, the passive initial mechanical conditions for maximum active responses were not identical in the two arteries. VPA alone proved to be ineffective, but elicited a significant potentiating effect on the NE responses in both tangential and radial directions. This potentiating effect was 3-4 times larger in CC than in IA. The initial mechanical conditions for maximum NE responses and for maximum potentiation by VPA were the same in both arteries. It is concluded that the mechanical property of the passive arterial wall elements is an important factor in determining the regionally different characteristics of the contractile responses. Quantitative, reliable comparison of vasoactive drug effects can not be carried out without setting properly the mechanical state of the vessel wall. Maximum potency of VPA in enhancing the NE vasoconstriction is connected to the same passive mechanical condition as the maximum constrictor effect of NE.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)11-23
Number of pages13
JournalActa Physiologica Academiae Scientiarum Hungaricae
Volume52
Issue number1
Publication statusPublished - 1978

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Vasopressins
Norepinephrine
Arteries
Pressure
Arginine Vasopressin
Common Carotid Artery
Muscle Contraction
Vasoconstriction
Smooth Muscle
Canidae
Hormones
Pharmaceutical Preparations
vascular factor
In Vitro Techniques
Direction compound

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Physiology

Cite this

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title = "Relationship between biomechanical factors and vascular reactions during activation by physiological doses of norepinephrine and vasopressin in vitro",
abstract = "Cylindrical segments of canine iliac (IA) and common carotid (CC) arteries were used to study the relation between the mechanical condition of the vessel wall and smooth muscle contractions elicited by physiological doses of vasoactive hormones in vitro. Effects of arginine vasopressin (VPA; 150 μU/ml) and norepinephrine (NE; 0.5 μg/ml) were determined on tangential strain and three dimensional stresses developing during slow elevation (100 mmHg/min) of the intraluminal pressure in 0-250 mmHg range at axial isometry. It was found that maximum outer diameter reduction (active tangential strain) caused by NE was about 7-8{\%} in CC, and 20{\%} in IA developing at 53-66 and 33-37 mmHg pressure, respectively. Maximum active stresses were around 4-6x105 dynes/cm2 in tangential, 0.6-1x105 dynes/cm2 in axial and -2x104 dynes/cm2 in radial directions. Though the maximum active strain developed at much lower passive initial strain and stress than the maximum active stress in both CC and IA, the passive initial mechanical conditions for maximum active responses were not identical in the two arteries. VPA alone proved to be ineffective, but elicited a significant potentiating effect on the NE responses in both tangential and radial directions. This potentiating effect was 3-4 times larger in CC than in IA. The initial mechanical conditions for maximum NE responses and for maximum potentiation by VPA were the same in both arteries. It is concluded that the mechanical property of the passive arterial wall elements is an important factor in determining the regionally different characteristics of the contractile responses. Quantitative, reliable comparison of vasoactive drug effects can not be carried out without setting properly the mechanical state of the vessel wall. Maximum potency of VPA in enhancing the NE vasoconstriction is connected to the same passive mechanical condition as the maximum constrictor effect of NE.",
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AU - Monos, E.

AU - Cox, R. H.

AU - Peterson, L. H.

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N2 - Cylindrical segments of canine iliac (IA) and common carotid (CC) arteries were used to study the relation between the mechanical condition of the vessel wall and smooth muscle contractions elicited by physiological doses of vasoactive hormones in vitro. Effects of arginine vasopressin (VPA; 150 μU/ml) and norepinephrine (NE; 0.5 μg/ml) were determined on tangential strain and three dimensional stresses developing during slow elevation (100 mmHg/min) of the intraluminal pressure in 0-250 mmHg range at axial isometry. It was found that maximum outer diameter reduction (active tangential strain) caused by NE was about 7-8% in CC, and 20% in IA developing at 53-66 and 33-37 mmHg pressure, respectively. Maximum active stresses were around 4-6x105 dynes/cm2 in tangential, 0.6-1x105 dynes/cm2 in axial and -2x104 dynes/cm2 in radial directions. Though the maximum active strain developed at much lower passive initial strain and stress than the maximum active stress in both CC and IA, the passive initial mechanical conditions for maximum active responses were not identical in the two arteries. VPA alone proved to be ineffective, but elicited a significant potentiating effect on the NE responses in both tangential and radial directions. This potentiating effect was 3-4 times larger in CC than in IA. The initial mechanical conditions for maximum NE responses and for maximum potentiation by VPA were the same in both arteries. It is concluded that the mechanical property of the passive arterial wall elements is an important factor in determining the regionally different characteristics of the contractile responses. Quantitative, reliable comparison of vasoactive drug effects can not be carried out without setting properly the mechanical state of the vessel wall. Maximum potency of VPA in enhancing the NE vasoconstriction is connected to the same passive mechanical condition as the maximum constrictor effect of NE.

AB - Cylindrical segments of canine iliac (IA) and common carotid (CC) arteries were used to study the relation between the mechanical condition of the vessel wall and smooth muscle contractions elicited by physiological doses of vasoactive hormones in vitro. Effects of arginine vasopressin (VPA; 150 μU/ml) and norepinephrine (NE; 0.5 μg/ml) were determined on tangential strain and three dimensional stresses developing during slow elevation (100 mmHg/min) of the intraluminal pressure in 0-250 mmHg range at axial isometry. It was found that maximum outer diameter reduction (active tangential strain) caused by NE was about 7-8% in CC, and 20% in IA developing at 53-66 and 33-37 mmHg pressure, respectively. Maximum active stresses were around 4-6x105 dynes/cm2 in tangential, 0.6-1x105 dynes/cm2 in axial and -2x104 dynes/cm2 in radial directions. Though the maximum active strain developed at much lower passive initial strain and stress than the maximum active stress in both CC and IA, the passive initial mechanical conditions for maximum active responses were not identical in the two arteries. VPA alone proved to be ineffective, but elicited a significant potentiating effect on the NE responses in both tangential and radial directions. This potentiating effect was 3-4 times larger in CC than in IA. The initial mechanical conditions for maximum NE responses and for maximum potentiation by VPA were the same in both arteries. It is concluded that the mechanical property of the passive arterial wall elements is an important factor in determining the regionally different characteristics of the contractile responses. Quantitative, reliable comparison of vasoactive drug effects can not be carried out without setting properly the mechanical state of the vessel wall. Maximum potency of VPA in enhancing the NE vasoconstriction is connected to the same passive mechanical condition as the maximum constrictor effect of NE.

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