Regulatory aspects of membrane microdomain (Raft) dynamics in live cells

A biophysical approach

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

18 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Most vertebrate cells display a considerable microheterogeneity in their plasma membranes, often termed microdomain structure. Some of these microdomains are enriched in glycosphingolipids and cholesterol and are resistant to solubilization with nonionic detergents; they are therefore called detergent-insoluble-glycolipid enriched membrane (DIG) or glycosphingolipid enriched membrane (GEM). These domains, also called lipid rafts (Simons and Ikonen, 1997), may form at the plasma membrane (PM) upon external stimuli or may be present in a preassembled form upon vesicular traffic to and fusion with the PM (Simons and Ikonen, 1997; Brown and Rose, 1992). We consider lipid rafts as transient molecular associations between lipid and protein components of the PM, providing a dynamic patchiness and local order in the fluid mosaic membrane (Edidin, 2001). Although the microdomain concept is widely accepted, and the existence of rafts has been confirmed by many lines of experimental evidence (e.g., biochemical data on detergent resistance, resolving membrane patchiness by high-resolution fluorescence and electron microscopies, tracking by videomicroscopy the lipid and protein motions in the membrane, etc.), some basic questions about the microdomains still remain open or highly controversial.

Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationMembrane Microdomain Signaling: Lipid Rafts in Biology and Medicine
PublisherHumana Press Inc.
Pages15-46
Number of pages32
ISBN (Print)9781592598038, 159259803X, 9781588293541
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2005

Fingerprint

Membrane Microdomains
Cell membranes
Membranes
Cell Membrane
Detergents
Lipids
Glycosphingolipids
Video Microscopy
Fluorescence microscopy
Glycolipids
Fluorescence Microscopy
Electron microscopy
Vertebrates
Electron Microscopy
Proteins
Fusion reactions
Cholesterol
Fluids

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology(all)

Cite this

Matkó, J., & Szöllősi, J. (2005). Regulatory aspects of membrane microdomain (Raft) dynamics in live cells: A biophysical approach. In Membrane Microdomain Signaling: Lipid Rafts in Biology and Medicine (pp. 15-46). Humana Press Inc.. https://doi.org/10.1385/1-59259-803-X:015

Regulatory aspects of membrane microdomain (Raft) dynamics in live cells : A biophysical approach. / Matkó, J.; Szöllősi, J.

Membrane Microdomain Signaling: Lipid Rafts in Biology and Medicine. Humana Press Inc., 2005. p. 15-46.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

Matkó, J & Szöllősi, J 2005, Regulatory aspects of membrane microdomain (Raft) dynamics in live cells: A biophysical approach. in Membrane Microdomain Signaling: Lipid Rafts in Biology and Medicine. Humana Press Inc., pp. 15-46. https://doi.org/10.1385/1-59259-803-X:015
Matkó J, Szöllősi J. Regulatory aspects of membrane microdomain (Raft) dynamics in live cells: A biophysical approach. In Membrane Microdomain Signaling: Lipid Rafts in Biology and Medicine. Humana Press Inc. 2005. p. 15-46 https://doi.org/10.1385/1-59259-803-X:015
Matkó, J. ; Szöllősi, J. / Regulatory aspects of membrane microdomain (Raft) dynamics in live cells : A biophysical approach. Membrane Microdomain Signaling: Lipid Rafts in Biology and Medicine. Humana Press Inc., 2005. pp. 15-46
@inbook{83fad3dbcf1d41e29b3708259cc660f1,
title = "Regulatory aspects of membrane microdomain (Raft) dynamics in live cells: A biophysical approach",
abstract = "Most vertebrate cells display a considerable microheterogeneity in their plasma membranes, often termed microdomain structure. Some of these microdomains are enriched in glycosphingolipids and cholesterol and are resistant to solubilization with nonionic detergents; they are therefore called detergent-insoluble-glycolipid enriched membrane (DIG) or glycosphingolipid enriched membrane (GEM). These domains, also called lipid rafts (Simons and Ikonen, 1997), may form at the plasma membrane (PM) upon external stimuli or may be present in a preassembled form upon vesicular traffic to and fusion with the PM (Simons and Ikonen, 1997; Brown and Rose, 1992). We consider lipid rafts as transient molecular associations between lipid and protein components of the PM, providing a dynamic patchiness and local order in the fluid mosaic membrane (Edidin, 2001). Although the microdomain concept is widely accepted, and the existence of rafts has been confirmed by many lines of experimental evidence (e.g., biochemical data on detergent resistance, resolving membrane patchiness by high-resolution fluorescence and electron microscopies, tracking by videomicroscopy the lipid and protein motions in the membrane, etc.), some basic questions about the microdomains still remain open or highly controversial.",
author = "J. Matk{\'o} and J. Sz{\"o}llősi",
year = "2005",
doi = "10.1385/1-59259-803-X:015",
language = "English",
isbn = "9781592598038",
pages = "15--46",
booktitle = "Membrane Microdomain Signaling: Lipid Rafts in Biology and Medicine",
publisher = "Humana Press Inc.",

}

TY - CHAP

T1 - Regulatory aspects of membrane microdomain (Raft) dynamics in live cells

T2 - A biophysical approach

AU - Matkó, J.

AU - Szöllősi, J.

PY - 2005

Y1 - 2005

N2 - Most vertebrate cells display a considerable microheterogeneity in their plasma membranes, often termed microdomain structure. Some of these microdomains are enriched in glycosphingolipids and cholesterol and are resistant to solubilization with nonionic detergents; they are therefore called detergent-insoluble-glycolipid enriched membrane (DIG) or glycosphingolipid enriched membrane (GEM). These domains, also called lipid rafts (Simons and Ikonen, 1997), may form at the plasma membrane (PM) upon external stimuli or may be present in a preassembled form upon vesicular traffic to and fusion with the PM (Simons and Ikonen, 1997; Brown and Rose, 1992). We consider lipid rafts as transient molecular associations between lipid and protein components of the PM, providing a dynamic patchiness and local order in the fluid mosaic membrane (Edidin, 2001). Although the microdomain concept is widely accepted, and the existence of rafts has been confirmed by many lines of experimental evidence (e.g., biochemical data on detergent resistance, resolving membrane patchiness by high-resolution fluorescence and electron microscopies, tracking by videomicroscopy the lipid and protein motions in the membrane, etc.), some basic questions about the microdomains still remain open or highly controversial.

AB - Most vertebrate cells display a considerable microheterogeneity in their plasma membranes, often termed microdomain structure. Some of these microdomains are enriched in glycosphingolipids and cholesterol and are resistant to solubilization with nonionic detergents; they are therefore called detergent-insoluble-glycolipid enriched membrane (DIG) or glycosphingolipid enriched membrane (GEM). These domains, also called lipid rafts (Simons and Ikonen, 1997), may form at the plasma membrane (PM) upon external stimuli or may be present in a preassembled form upon vesicular traffic to and fusion with the PM (Simons and Ikonen, 1997; Brown and Rose, 1992). We consider lipid rafts as transient molecular associations between lipid and protein components of the PM, providing a dynamic patchiness and local order in the fluid mosaic membrane (Edidin, 2001). Although the microdomain concept is widely accepted, and the existence of rafts has been confirmed by many lines of experimental evidence (e.g., biochemical data on detergent resistance, resolving membrane patchiness by high-resolution fluorescence and electron microscopies, tracking by videomicroscopy the lipid and protein motions in the membrane, etc.), some basic questions about the microdomains still remain open or highly controversial.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84920074559&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=84920074559&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1385/1-59259-803-X:015

DO - 10.1385/1-59259-803-X:015

M3 - Chapter

SN - 9781592598038

SN - 159259803X

SN - 9781588293541

SP - 15

EP - 46

BT - Membrane Microdomain Signaling: Lipid Rafts in Biology and Medicine

PB - Humana Press Inc.

ER -